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coyotehunter

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coyotehunter last won the day on October 7

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About coyotehunter

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    Super Member
  • Birthday 11/11/1951

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fonthill
  • Interests
    hunting, 3D archery, fishing, computers, photography, outdoor writing

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  1. God......now I have to listen to all this for the next year. I have to admit though he does a lot of prep work, scouting, archery practice...he earns his animals. Now if he could just work on his modesty.
  2. If mooseslayer gets his buck, we (his brothers) will have to listen to him for the next year....problem is that its not braggin' if it's a fact.
  3. Where was this? In Niagara? You cannot run around in the bushes willy nilly without a hunting licence in an area where you can legally discharge the firearm. They could be charged (and should have been charged with a number of offences and confiscation of the "weapon(s)" should have occurred. They shoot something or someone and the antis will have further ammunition to banish guns period - even from the law abiding users like us. It doesn't matter how young they are... they have to be accountable.
  4. Daily limit 5 possession limit 10 2 squirrel will feed the wife and I Cut the squirrels into 4 legs, rib cage and lower back sections. Put into a pot of water with garlic powder, salt, pepper and sage...boil until meat almost ready to fall off bones. Remove the squirrel pieces and douse in beaten egg. Dredge the pieces in a bag of crushed original Ritz crackers until fully coated. After just enough time in a well margarine frying pan to brown the cracker coating, serve with buttery mashed potatoes and corn. I usually have to bring a big stick to the table to make sure the wife lets me have my fair share.
  5. Too much work and inclement weather was making me cranky so when yesterday was open and the weather acceptable I proceeded to do one of my favorite type of hunt.......squirrels with a .22 rifle!! Sneakin' and peekin' thru the bush is great practice for other kinds of hunting and the challenge of hitting a target as small as a squirrel at ranges up to 50 yards can be a problem ...this ain't bench rest shooting. Especially like yesterday where the wind was making the little buggers a tad skittish. You always see a lot more squirrels than you get a shot at - you probably get a shot at a fifth of the squirrels you see. They keep moving ( you have a rifle). They are up in the tree (you have a rifle). They are too close...a couple of tree rats snuck up from behind and surprised me at arms length (you have a scoped rifle). Yesterday was that...I probably saw over thirty squirrels. But there were a number of slow witted, blind and deaf tree rats that gave me opportunities for a shot. The gods were smilin' on me yesterday....5 shots .....5 squirrels and a limit. The downer was that I had to quit when I was hot. Lottery ticket store here I come. Of course, the lottery gods are different than the hunting gods....way worse.
  6. Look on the bright side of it........you can buy your own birthday and Xmas presents.....forget about them and come the day it's a surprise and you know you'll get something you'll like and can use. Also when the wife updates the honey-do list you have a ready made excuse for not doing it. Anddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd drat, I forgot what I was going to say.
  7. Yes , hunting with the brothers is special, but there is always the element of competition in the hunting and fishing. Having a brother netting your fish that is bigger than his always carries the fear of a netting "accident". But it is a tradition we look forward to all year because we make time for it. Down home family, jobs, and other cr@p can make it difficult for all of us to hunt and fish together. As well, some hunt with other gangs, e.g moose. But the bear hunt is always great albeit a lot of work at times. But we are still doing it together. Getting eight 45 gallon drums worth of donuts for the initial baiting trip and an 8 1/2 hour drive and getting it in the barrels and setting up trail cameras for each bait can be a lot of work. Getting the docks in, clearing out paths through the wild rice plug up the shorelines is a pain. Doing the improvements each year to make it easier is a pain. The youngest is 54 and the oldest (me) is almost 68 so we have to do it while we can. However, everyone chips in, the work gets done and when you sit on the deck with a beverage or doctored coffee in the morning, look out over the lake with the ducks feeding in the wild rice, and a loon make the call that is so typical of the north........it is worth it. (Besides we bring lots of Ben Gay and Tylenol)
  8. Got up to the camp for the fall bear hunt that opened August 15th. The five brothers have a camp 20 miles north of Kirkland Lake. A log cabin that was built in the fifties. We added a bunkhouse after we bought it and every year have made improvements. New dock original cabin with bunkhouse added inside sleeping area This is the morning view out the cabin door and the evening view Some of the fish caught over the years This year we put in a new kitchen and window over sink New back deck for storing hunting gear New cover over front deck Despite the work put in we managed to get out and hunt. The yearly ritual of sorting through the trail camera photos from each of the eight baits to determine (in our own minds) the baits we liked consisted of going through hundreds of photos which included ravens, chipmunks, squirrels, lynx, wolf, and of course .....bear. Our philosophy is to have every person a chance at a bear. Accordingly, after seeing the camera photos, we draw for picking order. Any person who did not get a bear the previous year is in the A pool ( first ones to pick). All others are in the B pool. Each pool member draws a card to determine picking order within the pool. Selection depends on how you feel about the bait from previous experience and of course the trail camera photos. I didn't shoot a bear last year because I only saw small bear so I had first pick and then the others drew cards. The first evening was interesting when a small bear came in to the bait. Chipmunks and squirrels entertained me while I listened to the ducks quacking on the lake. Finally it was too dark to shoot and I decided to turn on my light to look at the barrel...crap...there was a bear between me and the bait ...10 yards from me. All I caught was a black blur as he set a new land speed record in getting out of Dodge. The consolation was that I had been quiet enough for him to come in and he didn't get my scent. Of course I still had to walk out in the dark, get back to camp and change my underwear. Back at camp the others had seen bears but nothing big enough to shoot. The next night was a repeat of the first with the small bear coming in again. Then with minutes of shooting light I saw a bear coming down the hill to the rear of the bait. I checked the video camera....drat ...not enough light. He came to the bait but didn't present a broadside shot. In fact, he continued towards the tree stand and stopped 10 yards away. The wind had been swirling a bit and I could see he was a bit cautious. Then he stood up on his hind legs and stood there sniffing the air....neat stuff.....darn... no camera. I'm worrying that shooting time was near an end when he drops down and returns to the bait only to walk behind it and turn as if to go back up the hill. After a few seconds (seemed like hours) he decided he wanted a donut and came back to the bait. With minutes of legal shooting time left he turned broadside and I shot. He went back behind the bait and within seconds I heard a couple of death moans. After a few minutes to settle down I got out of the stand to look for blood. He broke the arrow and there wasn't much blood but 20 yards later I was standing over a 240 lb. bear. The next morning was spent processing the bear and getting the packaged meat to the freezer in the trailer park across the lake. And getting the ribs prepared for the feast that night. Brother Russ and ribs ready for the bbq. We ate bear ribs, fresh caught walleye, home made spaghetti and sauce, home made chili and beer can chicken among our meals that week. The second night my brother Larry shot a 275 lb. bear with a huge head. Bears are scored with head measurements and it had a green score that suggested it would make the Ontario record book at least. It was an old male with massive front end and relatively small hindquarters. The third day the weather turned on us. Daily rains and winds that hampered the hunting and certainly put a crimp in Larry's and my fishing. Brother John (aka Mooseslayer) took a shot at a bear only to have a clap of thunder startle it as he shot resulting in a shot a bit farther back than he liked. He decided to back out and not spook it. Driving a boat back to camp in a driving rain wasn't fun for him and the other brothers (Russ and Paul) who had been out as well. Of course Larry and I were in front of the woodstove with a glass of Irish feeling lucky we already had our bear. The next morning after a night of rain we had no blood trail but good tracking of crushed vegetation and broken sticks (especially by John) resulted in a found bear. Unfortunately wolves or another bear had eaten about 20 lbs of meat from the hindquarters (the good stuff) but we took it back to camp and salvaged most of the meat. Rainy weather and winds made for miserable conditions for Russ and Paul and they didn't get a shot at a decent bear.......A pool next year. All in all a good trip. Of course it is always good to hunt with brothers. The three bears this year brings the camp total to 58 bears. My 240 lb bear Larry's 275 lb bear The five brothers and Larry's bear
  9. try the thin rubber strings from a spinnerbait...you can buy just the skirt at a tackle shop......half hitches will work. I still have some of the old whisker style string silencers....they are a little stronger than the skirts but you may find some heavier skirts
  10. brookie... be careful cause what you are doing can be interpreted as hunting and with out a controlled tag... well you do the math
  11. Saw 5 deer today...2 in the dark going in....3 in the dark going out have fun Tuesday........50-80 km winds......I think I'll stay out of the tree stand
  12. Thank god for global warming......just think how bad it would be without it
  13. The hawks like the seed we put out for the critters, i.e. bait and you can tell when they are around because everything disappears and the squirrels freeze in the trees. They don't just take little stuff either. One time I was out hunting rabbits with the beagle and just as she was bringing the rabbit around she stopped barking. Thinking she had lost the track or the rabbit went into a hollow tree, I went over to where I last heard her howl. The snow said it all...... rabbit and dog tracks and then just dog tracks and scuff marks in the snow. The beagle started bark at a tree and looking up I saw the thief.....a big red tailed hawk had picked off the bunny as it was looking over its shoulder to see where the dog was. All I could do was salute a better hunter than I was and go find something else to chase. I think the dog was disgusted with me for not shooting the hawk.
  14. Farmers benefit in the higher price for corn due to ethanol. But corn is very hard on the land and needs a lot of fertilizer plus the roundup to kill the weeds before planting. Put the land to use growing corn for ethanol and you don't put it into food grains like wheat ..... guess where the price of wheat and bread goes ....up. plus the corn goes to ethanol not food. My understanding is you can get ethanol with a cellulose based process. So..... take a "weed" like switch grass which will grow on any piece of c*&p soil and use it for ethanol. NOPE! Big agriculture has too much invested in corn for ethanol. Besides it makes too much sense for the politicians and could cost them votes with the farm lobby if they lose this type of income. As usual a lot of bs and people making money and forgetting common sense and the bigger picture.....the rest of us.
  15. I'm probably too picky but I like wild game too much so I butcher them myself. The last meat I got from a butcher was as part of a group and I was disappointed in the results. It was all bone in and a significant amount of fat was left. The meat surface appeared grey from the smeared fat and bone dust from the bandsaw. In my experience most of the gamey flavor people associate with wild meat can be attributed to the fat and bone marrow left on the meat. I debone everything and remove all fat and connective tissue. I find that the fat doesn't keep well after several months in the freezer. I am fanatical about removing all bloodshot, hair and washing the meat thoroughly. I also vacuum seal rather than use butcher paper. I have a deer I got today that I will butcher up and make roasts, chops, burger and maybe some sausage. When my brothers and I go up for bear in august we butcher them all up there. Not a problem and a lot of good eating. Don't get me wrong, if you don't have the time or a place to cut up the animal by all means go to a butcher. I just feel that I get meat the way I like it and find it a satisfying part of the ritual of being a hunter.
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