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DarkEdge

Goby fishing?

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Just wondering, but how bad are the goby in Erie? I don't mind fishing out problems and pests, so if I could do my part, I'd gladly help remove as many as I could from the water. Problem is, I know nothing about gobies.

How deep (or shallow) do they usually run?

What's the best bait/rig to catch them?

What am I suppose to do with them after I catch them? (I know they have to be destroyed, but what do I do with the remains?)

If anyone has any hints, advice, or whatever, let me know? Thanks

Dark Edge

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I was recently told they are very good eating. I have not tried them Yet. People have told me you can't eat them because of the pollution. I just had a big plate of smelt; have you read the advisory on them?

While doing a clean up with the OCAA Raymond described how they use to catch gobies in the home land. Simply cut the top off a can of pop and force a skewer through the side at both the top end and the bottom. The top skewer is for tieing your line to. The bottom one you actually skewer a shrimp to. Let it go down to the bottom (weight in can) and wait a minute. The goby goes in the pop can to eat the shrimp. Simply raise the can because the goby won't swim out.

Tada you have a goby trap. What you do with it once you have it is your business. The OMNR suggest killing them but if you do that don't leave them in the rocks to create a stench. You can eat them or put antibiotics on there lips and gently revive them for all I care. Have fun with that :clapping:

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What's the regulation on returning the "remains" (for lack of better term) to the water? Where I'm from, it's encouraged to put killed rough fish back in the drink for other fish to feed on. I haven't seen anything in the book on that one, though.

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I don't think there are any regulations about "disposal." It is illegal to possess live round gobies, so if you are going to keep them, you must kill them immediately. It is also illegal to use them for bait.

I'm not familiar with anyone who targets them deliberately, but it wouldn't be difficult. A smallish hook, a bit of worm or corn and let it sink right to the bottom. They are pretty good at stripping a hook, so you might be in for a bit of a challenge.

Myself, I'm a fly angler, and I've never had a goby take a fly, but I wouldn't be surprised if they did.

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Gobies like some kind of structure like rocks they can hide in if startled. Seems they don't like silty bottems. They like to take thier dinner bak into thier hiding hole which means a lot of snags. Like coachman said; they'll take worm or corn but when it comes down to it they will attempt to eat anything they can fit in thier mouth. It's best to thrown them to the gulls as they love them instead of just tossing they on the bank.

My son caught a huge, black gobie last week. It must have been8 or 9 inches? It was the largest I've ever seen. I noticed these black ones seem to be popping up around Hamilton harbour? Has anyone else noticed this? It appears to be two species of gobie? The black ones and the smaller round goby ( brown ones)

My 5 year old son has no complaints though :P:clapping:

apparently one guy caught one that was a foot long in frenchman's bay last year

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I was recently told they are very good eating. I have not tried them Yet. People have told me you can't eat them because of the pollution. I just had a big plate of smelt; have you read the advisory on them?

While doing a clean up with the OCAA Raymond described how they use to catch gobies in the home land. Simply cut the top off a can of pop and force a skewer through the side at both the top end and the bottom. The top skewer is for tieing your line to. The bottom one you actually skewer a shrimp to. Let it go down to the bottom (weight in can) and wait a minute. The goby goes in the pop can to eat the shrimp. Simply raise the can because the goby won't swim out.

Tada you have a goby trap. What you do with it once you have it is your business. The OMNR suggest killing them but if you do that don't leave them in the rocks to create a stench. You can eat them or put antibiotics on there lips and gently revive them for all I care. Have fun with that :clapping:

I think that you are wrong. You say that what you do with a goby is your business. The ministry says that it should be destroyed and not released back into any waters. Someone who is so conservation minded should not be making the statement that you did.

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I think that you are wrong. You say that what you do with a goby is your business. The ministry says that it should be destroyed and not released back into any waters. Someone who is so conservation minded should not be making the statement that you did.

This gets brought up every year.. so I'll give you the twitter version in 140 characters or less..

The kill what you catch regulation for gobies was for when they thought we could actually control them.. They're here to stay so do what you want just don't spread them to my cottage lake spank you berry much.

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I would tend to agree with that. it doesn't matter how many you throw up on the bank, you just simply aren't going to make a difference. just like Carp, we have to learn to live with them now................that's the reallity of it. till they say it's illegal to throw them back, I throw them back personally. that's my choice till someone says it's no longer my choice.

Rich

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Gobies do not have a swim bladder, so they will be found on or very near the bottom, and mostly stationary. Any I get never make it back alive. :clapping: They are bad on Erie but I'm sure no worse than a lot of bodies of water. Fishing for perch on Erie can get you into a lot of them, even out in the deep water.

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Just wondering, but how bad are the goby in Erie? I don't mind fishing out problems and pests, so if I could do my part, I'd gladly help remove as many as I could from the water. Problem is, I know nothing about gobies.

How deep (or shallow) do they usually run?

What's the best bait/rig to catch them?

What am I suppose to do with them after I catch them? (I know they have to be destroyed, but what do I do with the remains?)

If anyone has any hints, advice, or whatever, let me know? Thanks

Dark Edge

Are you being a smart ass? I find it hard to believe that you fish and don't know about gobies.

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Are you being a smart ass? I find it hard to believe that you fish and don't know about gobies.

No, I just moved up here from Oklahoma. We have Asian Carp, Bighead Carp, Silver Carp, but no goby. We're even starting to get the zebra mussels in our rivers, flowing down from the Mississippi. But never once have I caught or fished for a goby.

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OK a clarification is in order for my previous statement. What you do with gobies is not your business because you can not use them as bait nor posses them alive. However if you decide your a C&R fisherman and want to return them to the water from which you just caught it; I support your decision. Some people don't like to kill anything especially if they are not going to eat it. I wouldn't want to turn anyone off of fishing by forcing them to needlessly kill fish. I say needlessly because there is no way we will ever put a dent in the population without killing other species as well (toxins). Gobies have become naturalized and are now part of the forage base.

Yes I am conservation minded but that doesn't mean close minded. I don't pick fly crap out of pepper either. The most important thing to know about gobies is how to prevent their spread. Using gobies as bait in waters where they do not exist already would be criminal. Don't quote me on this but their eggs may be fertile despite the fish being dead. This is why the invasive smelt is not allowed as bait in certain waters. There were quite a few members here disgusted by the site of smelts left on shore in Queenston earlier this year :clapping: so I fail to see the difference.

So as far as I'm concerned as long as you don't move em or use em as bait, what you decide to do with them is your business with no judgment from me. I actually think using them as bait should be allowed as long as they are used as caught (there and then) in the same body of water and never put in a container.

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So as far as I'm concerned as long as you don't move em or use em as bait, what you decide to do with them is your business with no judgment from me. I actually think using them as bait should be allowed as long as they are used as caught (there and then) in the same body of water and never put in a container.

I'd agree with you on that one. Down south, we have a hybrid bass that does terrible things to the fry populations. The rule there is,"You can keep them, you can eat them, or you can use them as bait, so long as it's in the same water they were caught." Most people eat them, since they are bass, and why waste a perfectly good meal for the chance of nothing?

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PS hey dark edge it's good to see you teaching your kid to fish using this species. When a fish is easy to catch it keeps the kids entertained. When they start getting tired of catching the same fish; challenge them to target something a little more difficult.

Tip: Use the tiniest treble hook you can find and a small piece of worm or little red worm. The treble hook gets caught in their mouth so they don't swallow it as much.

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Unfortunately, my son lives in Texas, where he's learned to fish for bluegill and crappie. But when he comes to visit me up here (he hasn't been yet) I know gobies will be his new favourite chase.

Asking about this was for my benefit. I like to catch fish too, y'know. :clapping:

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GOBIES-kill them all!! :clapping:

I don`t like killing animals or fish(unless I`m going to eat it) but the gobies, I have no problem. We have to keep them under control as much as possible. They don`t belong hear.

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You eaten them, Walleye? Got any good recipes? If they're good eating like I heard before, I'm all about making the best of a bad situation.

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According to the reg's, they are to be destroyed and not thrown back in the water.

As for eating them, I'm sure Survivorman would say they are a great souce of protein........

http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/stdprodconsume/gr...ment/198219.pdf

Les would probably have a great backwoods goby recipe, using some sand and a little wild onion. I should email him, and find out.

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Hey! YOU could do it! Be the new survivor guy. The spots open cuz he's not doing the show anymore. First episode: "Niagara peninsula. The great Goby hunt and a dead horse to boot". :deadhorse:

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OK a clarification is in order for my previous statement. What you do with gobies is not your business because you can not use them as bait nor posses them alive. However if you decide your a C&R fisherman and want to return them to the water from which you just caught it; I support your decision. Some people don't like to kill anything especially if they are not going to eat it. I wouldn't want to turn anyone off of fishing by forcing them to needlessly kill fish. I say needlessly because there is no way we will ever put a dent in the population without killing other species as well (toxins). Gobies have become naturalized and are now part of the forage base.

Yes I am conservation minded but that doesn't mean close minded. I don't pick fly crap out of pepper either. The most important thing to know about gobies is how to prevent their spread. Using gobies as bait in waters where they do not exist already would be criminal. Don't quote me on this but their eggs may be fertile despite the fish being dead. This is why the invasive smelt is not allowed as bait in certain waters. There were quite a few members here disgusted by the site of smelts left on shore in Queenston earlier this year :deadhorse: so I fail to see the difference.

So as far as I'm concerned as long as you don't move em or use em as bait, what you decide to do with them is your business with no judgment from me. I actually think using them as bait should be allowed as long as they are used as caught (there and then) in the same body of water and never put in a container.

So if we go by your method and all the new fishermen read this thread, it's ok to do the opposite of what the regulations say. Time to go Bass fishing I guess, cause the Americans say its Ok and our reg book is only suggestions according to our Conservation Guru.... Telling people to not kill gobies is just like telling people to fillet and eat any Musky the catch, no matter size, season or area. If it's a rule thought it meant something? Didn't know you were above the MNR.

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should have a goby tournament, catch as many gobies as ya can and the one with the most weight wins, and everyone gets to :deadhorse:

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should have a goby tournament, catch as many gobies as ya can and the one with the most weight wins, and everyone gets to :deadhorse:

I'll register, as long as I don't need a license. And there's no registration fee.

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Ok, new question. How far north do the gobies run? And what are my chances of finding them in ponds that run from the Welland Canal?

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