Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
pike007

3 inch vrs 2.3/4 shotgun shells.

Recommended Posts

Well my uncle gave up hunting and passed down his 2 old sxs Italian berettas, only 1 in working condition... aswell as a whole bunch of shotgun shells 6 packs including some old holsters full. Problem is 95% percent of them are 3inch which I really never ever used. Ever since I started hunting 2/3/4s were the only size I would use. Except for # 4 buck shot in 3 inch for deer back in the day. Anyway majority of the shells are 3 inch "winchester double X magnum" in a # 6 shot. Im guessing they were just used for more of a powerful upland and small game shot. Anybody know anything about this particular load.

Also how many of you still use 3 inch for small game?

007

Edited by pike007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean still use 3"??

Many older shotguns only had 2 3/4" chambers. Then 3" came around. Now there are lots of 3.5" out there...mostly targetted towards geese and turkeys.

3" is what I use for turkeys. I have an old .410 that was chambered at 2 9/16" (weird B) ...ya try finding those shells) that I had a gunsmith bore to 3". Now if you don't think you would use a 3" chamberd gun...I know a good home for it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, like Flywire said. That load in #6 or #4 lead shot was a standard for duck. Now with lead banned for waterfowl hunting, there's not much of an application for those shells. They are overkill for cottontails & upland and not allowed on most trap ranges. Take someone fun shooting in the back-40 at cans, clays or plastic pop bottles full of water. Just clean up after you're done.

Edit: Just a thought, it might be a useful load on pheasants too, which around here is pretty much limited to pheasant farms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yep, like Flywire said. That load in #6 or #4 lead shot was a standard for duck. Now with lead banned for waterfowl hunting, there's not much of an application for those shells. They are overkill for cottontails & upland and not allowed on most trap ranges. Take someone fun shooting in the back-40 at cans, clays or plastic pop bottles full of water. Just clean up after you're done.

Edit: Just a thought, it might be a useful load on pheasants too, which around here is pretty much limited to pheasant farms.

Those shells and that gun would still work on dumb Northern Ontario Ruffed Grouse and Spruce Grouse, anyone know someone who goes up there during grouse season???

Edited by FishyWishy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duck eh, funny he never ever went duck hunting, he was more of a rabbit and pheasant guy. I called him today and I darn I shoulda already known this he used to do alot of Jack rabbit hunting... My guess he got all those shells on sale :)

007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is nothing wrong with those shells to be used for turkey, my guess is they're 1 5/8 oz. Probably used em for Jack's as well, they're a tough critter to kill! Also, I've never used 3 inch for small game, for rabbits and such I usually gun down to either a 16, 20 or 410, depending on where I'm going and the conditions..

Edited by niagarasteelheader

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As personal preference, I use #6 lead when pheasant hunting. In the double barrel, you could load one chamber with a 2 3/4" #7.5, and the other with a 3" #6. Closer shots taken with the shorter, smaller shot barrel, longer range with the more powerful load. Assuming the SxS you have is chambered for it, anyways. In the past, my bird hunting like that was done with a pump. I'd have a #7.5 2 3/4", followed by a 2 3/4" #6, then a 3" #5 (turkey load). As the bird flew, if I mislead the first shot, I had a slightly more powerful load behind it, and an even more powerful load behind that. Doing it that way, there was rarely a bird that got out of range on me (but a few I did jump by surprise, and got out of range long before I took a bead).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As personal preference, I use #6 lead when pheasant hunting. In the double barrel, you could load one chamber with a 2 3/4" #7.5, and the other with a 3" #6. Closer shots taken with the shorter, smaller shot barrel, longer range with the more powerful load. Assuming the SxS you have is chambered for it, anyways. In the past, my bird hunting like that was done with a pump. I'd have a #7.5 2 3/4", followed by a 2 3/4" #6, then a 3" #5 (turkey load). As the bird flew, if I mislead the first shot, I had a slightly more powerful load behind it, and an even more powerful load behind that. Doing it that way, there was rarely a bird that got out of range on me (but a few I did jump by surprise, and got out of range long before I took a bead).

Thats a pretty good technique that you cant go wrong with...I dont know how much Im really going to use this sxs , but im sure going to give it a shot. I have 4 other shotguns to deal with so between the times I actually get out hunting I think the old beretta is semi retired :) As for the shells I couldnot of got them at a better time running a little low on ammo as me and son were at the farm last week firing rounds at the starlings and crows for target practice. I do have a overunder that can shoot 3 inch so il be having some fun next time im out, my shoulder on the hand will not LOL

007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yep, like Flywire said. That load in #6 or #4 lead shot was a standard for duck. Now with lead banned for waterfowl hunting, there's not much of an application for those shells. They are overkill for cottontails & upland and not allowed on most trap ranges. Take someone fun shooting in the back-40 at cans, clays or plastic pop bottles full of water. Just clean up after you're done.

Edit: Just a thought, it might be a useful load on pheasants too, which around here is pretty much limited to pheasant farms.

Pheasant farms, where abouts?

007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Mossburg which takes 3 inch shells. I think a speedy reload is important but quite often when I operate the pump the spent shell gets hung up. Although it is easy to dislodge it takes a few seconds I haven't got if a second shot is needed. I'm looking to buy 2 3/4 inch shells once this box of 3's is finished. I have missed several geese because of this problem. Could be because the Mossburg was the cheapest gun out there and you get what you pay for. Does anyone else have this problem with a quality brand name?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That could be a couple issues with the shells sticking Dan. You might need to have the chamber brushed out a bit, or try a different brand of shells. I know with my BPS shorter brassed 2 3/4 inch shells would stick if they were anything hotter than a standard load. I have Winchester steel shells and Rotwiel slugs that hang up everytime, but work perfect in another gun. Its just a matter of finding out what your gun likes and sticking to that brand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think its just a common thing with pumps . My remington 870 pump will do that sometimes. On the other hand my remington 1100 semi auto has never jammed or let me down.

007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Mossburg which takes 3 inch shells. I think a speedy reload is important but quite often when I operate the pump the spent shell gets hung up. Although it is easy to dislodge it takes a few seconds I haven't got if a second shot is needed. I'm looking to buy 2 3/4 inch shells once this box of 3's is finished. I have missed several geese because of this problem. Could be because the Mossburg was the cheapest gun out there and you get what you pay for. Does anyone else have this problem with a quality brand name?

My 870 is chambered in 3". When I first started using it I was having the odd shell get stuck half way out of the chamber.

After spending some time with it at the range, it turns out I wasn't drawing the pump all the way through its full stroke. With a 2 3/4 you get used to the pump having a smaller stroke so when you cycle rounds quickly, it takes a couple times to get used to having to slide the pump further with the 3.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 870 is chambered in 3". When I first started using it I was having the odd shell get stuck half way out of the chamber.

After spending some time with it at the range, it turns out I wasn't drawing the pump all the way through its full stroke. With a 2 3/4 you get used to the pump having a smaller stroke so when you cycle rounds quickly, it takes a couple times to get used to having to slide the pump further with the 3.

I shoot an 870 SPS Mag and have never had an issue with a shell jamming up. Main thing to remember is eject the shell hard after you've shot. I do have a friend at school who bought a new 870 SPS in 3 1/2" and it seems to jam up alot. I also have a Browning BPS in 3" and its been flawless as well. I find the build quality to be a little cheaper but it still has been a good gun. My friend shoots a mossburg pump came with two barrels and is 3 1/2" and he hasen't had any problems with it jamming. One thing though is that he finds it quite heavy for walking all day and recoil is much greater when compared to my remington or browning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...