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Ive always used spinning rods and want to try a baitcasting rod this year for flipping and pitching tubes and senkos.
What gear ratio, length and action would you suggest? trying to keep the cost down of course.

Thanks

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I didn't really get into the baitcasting too much but I'm pretty sure you would want a reel around 7.1-1 ratio to get those fish out of heavy cover quick. Med/heavy-heavy rod to help pull the fish out of weeds with out snapping the rod and a fast action tip. Also heavy line maybe 30lb braid to cut the weeds when ripping the fish out and not snapping the line. And somewhere around a 8' rod.(heavy cover set up) I'm not a professional with flipping worms n tubes (I like top water for bass) but that's what I think. see what other more experienced ppl think also. Good luck

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Tyler has got it nailed down. I use an Okuma EVx-C-751MHa, 7'5" Med-Heavy/Fast for flipping, although I think I would prefer a little shorter rod.

One thing I would recommend, is stay with a spinning rod for Senkos. Way easier to control, cast and skip. Not too many guys throw senkos on casting gear...just the brave ones!

Some reel companies offer an 8:1 (13 Fishing Concept "A" and others) and a 9:1 (Abu Garcia Revo Rocket) Make sure the reel is super small (Shimano Chronarch 50e or any of the Lew's) so it fits in your hand comfortable. It will greatly improve casting accuracy as well as reduce fatigue.

Learn how to setup the casting reel and you won't ever go back to spinning gear for flippin'!

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I'm going to have to disagree with Tyler and josh on the size of the rod. An 8' rod is not needed for a shore fisherman or even a boater. The size of the rod is dependent on the size of the person. If your 5'9" a 8' rod is far to long. The average person is around 6' so I would recommend a rod that 7 to 7'3" medium heavy is perfect also you can use that rod for not just flipping or punching but throwing Texas and Carolina rigs as well as spinner baits.

I'm 6'5", a "tall bastard" as josh puts it and unless I'm using weights over 1oz for flipping worms jigs my rod is a 7'3" medium heavy 13 fishing envy. I'll use up to a 5/8 oz weight

There is an extremely well written article in last months bass mag and video on selecting rods and understanding action by g loomis I believe on the net. The bass mag article talks about selecting a rod based on your height. You don't wanna be trying to walk the dog on a top water or work a jerk bait with your rod tip smacking the boat shore or water. Far to often i see people out fishing with rods far too long for them.

No two rods are the same models and brands actions very greatly just because it says medium heavy flex the rod compare it to others.

http://www.tacklewarehouse.com/guides/rodselection.html

There's a little description on rod make ups. I'm working on a power point presentation for notre dame high school to talk about rod and reel selection.

P.S for reels use a 7. 3:1 reel gives you more options to use it for spinners or even cranks rather than a 8:1 gear ratio which is pretty limited. I do use a 8:1 ratio reel 13 concept A for tournaments but a 7.3:1 is perfect for the everyday angler.

Be sure to practice flipping a pitching as well often you only have one shot to get the bait to the fish. You wanna make it smooth and quiet. Me and josh will be at the sportsmans show in fort erie and I'll be talking flipping an pitching. If your interested

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Baitcasters are tricky and can be quite a learning curve. Since it's your first one, a good start is key.

I'd say get what ever rod you want in med/heavy. And ONLY fast or extra fast tip. You do not want some whippy noodle rod like an ugly stick. When it comes to flipping and pitching especially for someone that's new to casting gear, the rod is the least important part. All rods out now for the most part are plenty sensitive and strong enough to get started.

Take what you save on the rod and go up a step to a better reel. Higher ratio for flipping. Reels with a cheaper build quality will scare you away from baitcasters and you won't have any fun. Harder to cast and more backlashes garunteed. You can also have a bearing upgrade done but you still need a good reel to start with as a base. For the money invested, LEWS is the way to go. $100 will get you the same fishability that costs 150-175 from other brands.

For line, braid is the easiest to learn with as long as it's big enough. it's more flexible and less memory then mono or floro. 30# is too light for learning. The smaller diameter line will dig into itself on the spool and create backlashes. The lightest braid I have on a baitcaster is 40# and even that is pushing it. 50 or 65 is easier.

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Thanks,

I ended up going with a 6'6 med heavy rod with a 6:3.1. I got a pretty good deal and couldn't pass it up.

Now time to start practicing!!

just gonna put a big sinker on the end and practice flipping into a garbage can or something, is that the best way?

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Yep there's some good videos on YouTube on setting up a bait caster. That's awesome great starter setup that can be used for a variety of things. Niagara Bassmasters will be at the fort Erie spring fishing show come on by we will be glad to go over it.

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I use a coffee can. Try flipping and pitching into it. Start close and when you start hitting it or dropping it in' move back and do it again. I use a 1/2 oz flipping jig with a trailer and bend the hook in a bit.

I think the 6'6" might be too small for flippin and pitchin, unless you are Jarrett Edwards tall, it might be okay. But it is great for other things like jerkbaits, spinnerbaits or texas rigged worms and rodents in light weeds. 7' Heavy will help you set the hook in heavy cover and give you better accuracy for casting. You have to be weary of your line now. Don't go over the line rating on the new rod or it will snap.

...and like Joe said, ASK! Don't get discouraged if you can't get it right away, you are probably just missing one thing. Keep your line to 10-14 lb flouro until you get it. It will be easier to cast.

Tght Lines!

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