Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BCLT

Support Our Sport - Post On Bps

Recommended Posts

One small correction yakfish.... Carp are not an invasive species. They were an introduced species some 120 years back. No different than a brown trout, steelhead strains of rainbow, or pacific salmon. They were transplanted here by the powers that be at the time.

White perch, lamprey, entered the Great Lakes because of the Seaway as invasives. Asian carp and Rudd are invasives as escapes from fish farms that have spread like wildfire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because a species was intentionally introduced doesn't mean it can't be invasive. Even native species under the certain circumstances can become invasive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One small correction yakfish.... Carp are not an invasive species. They were an introduced species some 120 years back. No different than a brown trout, steelhead strains of rainbow, or pacific salmon. They were transplanted here by the powers that be at the time.

White perch, lamprey, entered the Great Lakes because of the Seaway as invasives. Asian carp and Rudd are invasives as escapes from fish farms that have spread like wildfire.

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/aquaticanimals/commoncarp/index.html

http://www.invasivespeciesmanitoba.com/site/index.php?page=common-carp

http://www.great-lakes.net/envt/flora-fauna/invasive/carp.html

http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/FactSheet.aspx?speciesID=4

Edited by yakfish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 1871, the US Fishery Commission was established to promote and bolster diminishing supplies of food fish during the mass immigration taking place in the US during the latter half of the 19th century. They settled on the common carp because it could adapt to almost all water conditions. Almost every state of the Union, at that time, bought into the program. Canada also followed suit in bringing brood stocks into the lower Great Lakes. The big problem is once established they will spread. Then again so have bass and black crappie.

No different than introducing trout or salmon. The only difference is that carp are a very adaptable species. Trout and salmon are not. Whether or not this agency, or that, decides to label the common carp an invasive, is merely an exercise in semantics and politics, simply because they do not have a multi million dollar industry attached to the species.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that the common carp can adapt to almost all water conditions is what makes it invasive. But, you right...at the end of the day it is all just semantics. The label assigned to the species doesn't change the fact that carp can be detrimental to a fishery if left unchecked as many studies have shown. I have personally seen lakes (in the States) become over run with carp and the fishery has suffered. These fisheries are now making a comeback since carp numbers have been decreased. Yes, bow fishing has played a role.

Don't get me wrong. I love carp fishing and for the most part I am happy to have them as an optional target species. But due to their adaptability your not going to kill the species very easily. This is how they differ from trout or salmon species that have been introduced. Bow fishing is unlikely to have a large impact on the population especially here in the Niagara where you just don't see many people doing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the land bags and pouring water on them. I think they were invented for the pay lakes in the uk as their fosh were being caught so often. The same people here are using barbed hooks. Carp areba hearty fish And possibly my favourite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carp fishing is like salmon fishing ....both are good scrappers , most are released and not so great for the dinner table . If the numbers get out of hand to the detriment of other fish species ,I'm sure they could be made into fertilizer for trees, not food products or to feed pets or animals we eat because both large carp & salmon would be contaminated (in the Niagara area) . If bow hunting is legal there should be rules for proper and useful disposal .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There use to be millions of bison and passenger pigeons and that is not a joke.

There also used to be sane women. Let's not let another species become extinct from the area

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carp fishing is like salmon fishing ....both are good scrappers , most are released and not so great for the dinner table . If the numbers get out of hand to the detriment of other fish species ,I'm sure they could be made into fertilizer for trees, not food products or to feed pets or animals we eat because both large carp & salmon would be contaminated (in the Niagara area) . If bow hunting is legal there should be rules for proper and useful disposal .

This is exactly right. I couldn't agree more. People need to exercise some common sense, unfortunanlty in today society that is asking too much!LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well , now that I see some carp have been caught , and tomorrow is to be warm and sunny, ......it's going to be a carp day !

Amen to that. A buddy of mine just texted me about going carping tomorrow. Hopefully we all get into some ! :Gonefishing:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying a new spot .....I know there's carp in there all spring & summer , but not sure what depth they like now since the water is still cold . It's about 6 -7' deep there with very little current . From what I've read , not much chum is needed ....got some oats-corn-powdered hemp mixture to entice them and some softened maize & canned corn for the hook . It would be nice to hook one first time out ! :Gonefishing:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the Starling and the Norway Rat I think they are here to stay so we make the best of it, they are great sport, that being said , I doubt there is a north american fisheries manager who would like to see them expand their range or if possible wouldn't turn the clock back and eliminate them from our waters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They can travel to many tribs and anything connected the the Great Lakes . Fifty years ago I was shore fishing at the Burnt River near Kinmount where my in laws had a cottage . I was bottom fishing for walleye using worms ....got a call for lunch & left my rod propped up on a branch with the drag backed off . When I returned the line was a way upstream but nothing was pulling the line . I reeled up the slack and a very large fish began to fight ......it was a 10-12 lb. carp . I never knew that tea stained water in that river had carp , a surprise indeed ......so they have been around a long time ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the Starling and the Norway Rat I think they are here to stay so we make the best of it, they are great sport, that being said , I doubt there is a north american fisheries manager who would like to see them expand their range or if possible wouldn't turn the clock back and eliminate them from our waters.

Same could be said about Europeans in North America, from a certain perspective, or any other historical mistake for that matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On this page http://www.invadingspecies.com/invaders/fish/northern-snakehead/ at the bottom you will find a link to the Field Guide to Invasive Species in Ontario. It states this."Impacts: Because its establishment predates many of the earliest fish surveys, the impact of Common Carp upon native fish assemblages in Ontario is difficult to assess" It goes on to say.In other regions, substantial and varied negative impacts have been documented. Feeding activity uproots aquatic plants, reducing food and breeding habitat for native invertebrates, birds and fishes 9. The associated disturbance of bottom sediments may increase turbidity and further inhibit plant growth. Larval carp may compete with native fish species for zooplankton 9. Adults compete with native fishes for benthic invertebrate prey. Predation on eggs of native fishes may adversely impact prey populations.

I would like to point out that they use the word may repeatedly. That means they are not sure.

The guide also states NOTE - We are not seeking reports on Common

Carp: This information sheet has been included to help
you differentiate Common Carp from similar-looking
species of carp in the guide, e.g., Grass Carp (Cypcte-
ide) and Goldfish (Cyp-car-aur) which should be
reported as per section 3.0 Reporting Procedure.

Also the fishing regulation summary lists the fish that are "invasive" and states the regulations pertaining to those species. The common carp is not listed as an invasive species. Yes there is a bow season for common carp .I would like to point out that that means they are protected by the same laws as other species such as no snagging and other regulations.

I think if you Google Lake Susan in Minnesota you will find out that removing carp from a lake can have unexpected and negative results. Honestly I don't think the effect of common carp on big bodies of water like the Great Lakes system is all that great. They are simply one more species. In small bodies of water they can overpopulate with negative results but so can other species. I would like to point out that the 15 year effort to restore Coote's Paradise Marsh by eliminating common carp from it has been a failure.

Man has had a long association with the common carp. They have been raised as food for hundreds of years and have spread all over the planet because of that association.

As far as bowfishing goes I don't think it has any real impact on the ecosystem anyway accept to remove all the very biggest specimen carp. They are not the most successful spawners though. Because they live a long time they are less fertile than the 8 to 12 pounders which produce the most offspring. Bowfishers are nor interested in 8 pound carp. Bowfishing and it's attendant wastefulness just don't fit in with today's fishing ethics either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...