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DNorton

Few Questions

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Hey guys long time reader, rarely post because I just have limited knowledge or experience in what is being discussed. Hope that doesn't hinder the responses I get here. Anyways to my questions, I am looking toward buying a kayak for this up coming season as a bigger boat is far to expensive and would love to "stay fit". After reading through countless threads I think I'm more confused then ever. Everyone seems to have a different opinion so I thought I would ask what would work ideally for me given my preferences / circumstances I guess you could say. Firstly I'm almost 6 ft about 200lbs on a good day looking to do some paddling and fishing recreationally. Not an expert by any means but have limited knowledge on paddling and what not. Would love to fish in the colder months as most of my summer is taken up by work(farming). I would be hauling it around with my little 4cylinder cobalt right now so I'm assuming something smaller would be best. Would ideally love to just paddle Martindale pond and Jordan harbour but was also wondering if I bought something would I be able to carry it down to Florida with me to kayak through the estuaries on the gulf side or is there a difference between saltwater and freshwater kayaks. Then I get reading and see people have them out in Lake Ontario is there a happy medium where I could do all the things with one or am I better off to stick to what I've been researching. I went to bass pro just to look around see prices see if anything really stuck out to me, talked to one sales rep and turned around and walked out. I was more confused then when I walked in because he was giving me conflicting information than what I have read. I've read through here hundreds of times and I figure the best possible advice is going to come from the people that are the closest thing to experts especially within this area.

Anyways thanks for you time in reading this. I know the grammar and punctuation is probably horrid as well as paragraph structure but doing this all from my phone so I just hope you can get past it and help a guy out. Going to make more of an effort to contribute to the community here as the amount of information here is astonishing. Thanks again

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Welcome, im no pro my any means. But from what I have seen sit on top is by far best, and 10-12 feet ideal. 12 ft is a bit more umpf to maneuver but would hypothetically be a bit more stable. If you can get a kayak thats designed for fishing then all the better. Couldn't talk brands but there are plenty of good brands. Take a look at outdoors oriented on fourth Ave in St. Catharines. Pretty sure they have angling kayaks and probably a bit more knowledgeable.

When you do purchase. Don't focus on the angling aspect right away. Learn the kayak, how it handles/tracks, and watch some videos on YouTube of what to do when you flip it (then practise that a few times). Never want to get caught out on a big pond and not know how to get back on your kayak. Make sure that the items you bring with you are either tethered or have a floatation device on it otherwise youl lose it.

Hope that doesn't make this any more confusing for you. Lots of kayak fishermen here who I'm sure would be glad to help.

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Thanks for the reply Jordanl. I plan on heading over to outdoors oriented but thought I'd ask here so I'm not completely lost when I walk in there feeling the same way when I stopped by bass pro. Really appreciate the time to reply and give me some insight.

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One other question that seems to elude me through my research but how many times do you actually get flipped? Obviously you have to be comfortable with the body of water your in to be out there but is it a rare thing or does it happen more times then people would like to admit ? And how does that work when your cold water fishing ?

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Thats a huge variable. It all depends where you are. One member here flipped his kayak in the cold water trying to get a drift by the dam.

A new kayaker will obviously flip easier than a seasoned kayaker. It also depends if there is boat traffic, wind, current, if you have to high of a center of balence ect. Don't over think it. My first time in a kayak I almost dumped it just trying to turn the thing, then again on my first cast, and again when trying to lip a decent bass. But I havnt tipped yet. It's just better to know what to do. Then flip it and end up in a worse situation. Also watch some videos on how to get in and out of the kayak. Sounds silly but it's harder than it looks.

As for the colder water, get a suit.obviously keeping dry is key.

Any other kayaker wanna chime in with tips or opinion?

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Been kayaking for years, love it. I started with two high end inflatable kayaks with canvas outer shells. Extremely stable but really slow. Tougher than you would think, had them in small streams and whitewater. Took them to myrtle beach in the wifes civic. I then bought 2 mid range sit in kayaks. No skirt, I used it almost every day. I had one stolen last year right off my truck, but that's Another story. I bought an ocean kayak 13 foot sit on top. There are bonuses two both. The sit in keeps you a little warmer in the cold weather it also keeps you a little drier. It is also lighter. Drrawbacks are that it is more confined, they is less room for fishing attachments, and they tend to be a little more tippy. The ocean kayak Is a sit on top, it is more stable, stable enough to stand on. I have room for coolers and even the dog. Sit on tops have drain holes in them that allow water to drain out. In the summer it's great, keeps you cool, in the winter you need to dress in waterproof material. Overall for what I do I like the sit on top better even in the winter. Also I would never sell my inflatables, I still use them and if we go somewhere for a weekend I bring them because they are so portable. Once the weather gets a little warmer pm me I will take you out you can try both of mine. Basics are wider stable but slow, longer tippy but fast. Cheers

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my buddy car tops 2 outbacks on his colbalt at 80 lbs a yak

get a 13 or 14 ft if you want a do everything yak and also do big water. im 6'3" 230 and i find the 10' 12' kayaks "tight" to move around in

imo you should look at something like these , ocean kayak 13 prowler or trident, wilderness 14 thresher or ride 135 and the jackson 14 cuda. they all handle well, fish well but i like the wilderness boats the most because of the seat, i liked it better then my old jackson or my native slayers "beach" style chair. im sorry i sold my ride 135

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Been kayaking for years, love it. I started with two high end inflatable kayaks with canvas outer shells. Extremely stable but really slow. Tougher than you would think, had them in small streams and whitewater. Took them to myrtle beach in the wifes civic. I then bought 2 mid range sit in kayaks. No skirt, I used it almost every day. I had one stolen last year right off my truck, but that's Another story. I bought an ocean kayak 13 foot sit on top. There are bonuses two both. The sit in keeps you a little warmer in the cold weather it also keeps you a little drier. It is also lighter. Drrawbacks are that it is more confined, they is less room for fishing attachments, and they tend to be a little more tippy. The ocean kayak Is a sit on top, it is more stable, stable enough to stand on. I have room for coolers and even the dog. Sit on tops have drain holes in them that allow water to drain out. In the summer it's great, keeps you cool, in the winter you need to dress in waterproof material. Overall for what I do I like the sit on top better even in the winter. Also I would never sell my inflatables, I still use them and if we go somewhere for a weekend I bring them because they are so portable. Once the weather gets a little warmer pm me I will take you out you can try both of mine. Basics are wider stable but slow, longer tippy but fast. Cheers

Thanks for the reply and the offer of taking me out to try it out. I will have to take you up on that offer when the weather gets a little nicer out! Really appreciate it.

my buddy car tops 2 outbacks on his colbalt at 80 lbs a yak

get a 13 or 14 ft if you want a do everything yak and also do big water. im 6'3" 230 and i find the 10' 12' kayaks "tight" to move around in

imo you should look at something like these , ocean kayak 13 prowler or trident, wilderness 14 thresher or ride 135 and the jackson 14 cuda. they all handle well, fish well but i like the wilderness boats the most because of the seat, i liked it better then my old jackson or my native slayers "beach" style chair. im sorry i sold my ride 135

Thank you for the advice this is what I was looking at before I think I really got into my own head. Although I've been told to do a ton of research before buying it just seemed to complicate things. Good to know a 13 or 14 ft kayak will be fine on the hood of my car. That was one of my few reserves when I was looking. I will have to research those that you suggested.

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this was the advice i was given when i was looking for my first yak

buy a brand name good quality yak first and foremost either new or used . use it for a year to learn what you like and dislike, want and dont want. also try other yaks when you can. this gives you time to learn while you are still fishing. then at the end of the year if you want a different size, brand or style just sell yours and buy it. if you bought a good quality yak it will sell quick and for a good buck. then whatever you lose can be called a years rent

i have always sold my yaks within a week and with lots of interest

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The inflatables are 12 years old, the manufacturer is advanced elements and the model is firefly. I think West Marine in the states had something similar. There are many new designs out there. I almost bought another last summer, was at a liquidation place for $300, couple models up from mine. 12 years old rode hard and put away wet, other than some dirt they both have held up extreamily well, no leaks, even the canvas is holding up well.

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If you want to spend lot of time in your kayak, buy a good quality brand. Also, are you looking for fast kayak or more slower, wider but more stable? What style of fishing do you like -trolling or casting while standing etc.? What is your budget ? Answers to these questions will help you to narrow down your options.

Lot of store sell a good quality kayaks - Sail, Complete Paddler, Fogh Marine, Muskoka Outfitter etc. Also you can rent different kind of kayaks and then decide what you like.

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Kayak Fishing will not give you a 'stay fit' approach. I paddle to my spot and sit there and eat snacks while I wait for fish.

The Wilderness Systems, Jackson Kayaks, high end brands can do salt and fresh water.

I will repeat what everyone is saying, check out outdoors oriented. I was surprised at how knowledgeable the staff is. Especially the owner and managers.

I have never flipped my 12 ft Tarpon or even come close. Getting into it off a dock one day I got a little wet but I did not go under! Keep 3 appendages in the boat at all the times and you should be fine I imagine. I did TONS of research before I bought and I still bought a used one just incase I did not take to the sport. I am now looking for a bigger better fishing machine. If you are dedicating your choice to strictly kayaking then go for something longer that can paddle faster and cut through the water more efficiently. My wide boat can only go so fast. It is all about what you want out of it.

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Thanks for the plugs guys.

Rival - You're doing the right thing by researching ahead of time, and there's lots of good info here to take in. To reiterate a few points to questions you had:

-Fishing kayaks are very stable, it takes a lot of effort to flip one. Wider will be more stable, but less efficient through the water, so it'll take more effort to get where you're going.

- You've mentioned paddling in cooler weather so keep in mind that sit on tops have "scupper" holes in the hull to drain out water that splashes on top, these can be plugged for a drier ride in cool weather. Also you'll have to consider the type of clothing you'll wear, even though flipping is rare, you want to always dress appropriately for the water temperature.

-You shouldn't have any trouble putting one kayak on the Cobalt. There's many ways to do it, cheapest will be foam blocks and straps, most expensive will be an aftermarket roof rack. For driving around locally foam blocks are probably fine, but if you're using it a lot, or doing long drives like Florida, personally I'd want a real rack. Not only is a rack more stable, it also allows more than one kayak, and allows somewhere to lock the kayak to if leaving it on overnight.

-From what you've said so far, a few boats I'd suggest looking at the following:

- Wilderness Systems Ride 115 - one of our most popular boats, the base model configuration is best for budget and then you add accessories as time goes on.

- Wilderness Systems Commander 120 - not a sit on top, instead it's almost a hybrid between a kayak and canoe, I suggest this as it'll be the best for cool weather, much drier than a sit on top.

- Perception Pescador Pro 10 - This is a brand new boat for 2016 and in my opinion offers a really good value. Awesome seat, lots of rigging options, built in rod holders and a really good price.

Someone else mentioned our Paddle Day, it's on May 1st at Charles Daley Park and allows you to test paddle and take advantage of sale pricing.

If you stop in before the spring, we'll be happy to give you the low down on the boats. The best people to ask for would be myself, BR, or Cheryl.

Jamie

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Thanks for the plugs guys.

Rival - You're doing the right thing by researching ahead of time, and there's lots of good info here to take in. To reiterate a few points to questions you had:

-Fishing kayaks are very stable, it takes a lot of effort to flip one. Wider will be more stable, but less efficient through the water, so it'll take more effort to get where you're going.

- You've mentioned paddling in cooler weather so keep in mind that sit on tops have "scupper" holes in the hull to drain out water that splashes on top, these can be plugged for a drier ride in cool weather. Also you'll have to consider the type of clothing you'll wear, even though flipping is rare, you want to always dress appropriately for the water temperature.

-You shouldn't have any trouble putting one kayak on the Cobalt. There's many ways to do it, cheapest will be foam blocks and straps, most expensive will be an aftermarket roof rack. For driving around locally foam blocks are probably fine, but if you're using it a lot, or doing long drives like Florida, personally I'd want a real rack. Not only is a rack more stable, it also allows more than one kayak, and allows somewhere to lock the kayak to if leaving it on overnight.

-From what you've said so far, a few boats I'd suggest looking at the following:

- Wilderness Systems Ride 115 - one of our most popular boats, the base model configuration is best for budget and then you add accessories as time goes on.

- Wilderness Systems Commander 120 - not a sit on top, instead it's almost a hybrid between a kayak and canoe, I suggest this as it'll be the best for cool weather, much drier than a sit on top.

- Perception Pescador Pro 10 - This is a brand new boat for 2016 and in my opinion offers a really good value. Awesome seat, lots of rigging options, built in rod holders and a really good price.

Someone else mentioned our Paddle Day, it's on May 1st at Charles Daley Park and allows you to test paddle and take advantage of sale pricing.

If you stop in before the spring, we'll be happy to give you the low down on the boats. The best people to ask for would be myself, BR, or Cheryl.

Jamie

Thanks for the reply and insight. I'll probably drop in this weekend and see what you guys are all about. Like I said when I was in bass pro I was ready to buy and left empty handed and confused. Your reply has helped a great deal. Looking forward to chatting more I store

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Thanks for the reply and insight. I'll probably drop in this weekend and see what you guys are all about. Like I said when I was in bass pro I was ready to buy and left empty handed and confused. Your reply has helped a great deal. Looking forward to chatting more I store

Sounds good, I'm not in this weekend, but BR is and he knows all these boats well (and actually has a Commander himself) We're still in "winter-mode" so all the models are are here, just hanging, we can always bring down though if you want to sit and play with any.

Jamie

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Looks like you've resceived a lot of good info already! If you plan on being out on the great lakes, oceans or any big water in general, I highly recommend a sit on top yak. The reason is that they are self bailing. If you get stuck far from shore and start getting water over the side it has no where to go and you have to manually bail the water out. Sit on tops have scupper holes and the water drains out as quickly as it comes in. Sit on top are great for fishing out of too. Many are stable enough to stand and cast from, offer lot of storage and rigging options. I fished from a 9.5 foot perception sit in for many years before upgrading and while it got me out on the water I was always sore after a few hours of fishing. So many of the newer angleing kayaks have fantastic seats that you can sit in all day and be comfortable. I've spent over 13 hours fishing non stop in mine. If I get tired of sitting I just stand and stretch my legs for a bit.

Typically longer boats are designed for bigger water. 12ft is a good all around length. Shorter yaks are easier to maneuver and longer yaks will be faster and track better.

Definetly stick to one of the name brands. I paddle a Feel free Lure 11.5 and it is an awesome fishing machine. I also really like Wilderness systems. Native and Hobie are a couple other to look at as well.

If your ever in need of a fishing partner let me know!

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Looks like you've resceived a lot of good info already! If you plan on being out on the great lakes, oceans or any big water in general, I highly recommend a sit on top yak. The reason is that they are self bailing. If you get stuck far from shore and start getting water over the side it has no where to go and you have to manually bail the water out. Sit on tops have scupper holes and the water drains out as quickly as it comes in. Sit on top are great for fishing out of too. Many are stable enough to stand and cast from, offer lot of storage and rigging options. I fished from a 9.5 foot perception sit in for many years before upgrading and while it got me out on the water I was always sore after a few hours of fishing. So many of the newer angleing kayaks have fantastic seats that you can sit in all day and be comfortable. I've spent over 13 hours fishing non stop in mine. If I get tired of sitting I just stand and stretch my legs for a bit.

Typically longer boats are designed for bigger water. 12ft is a good all around length. Shorter yaks are easier to maneuver and longer yaks will be faster and track better.

Definetly stick to one of the name brands. I paddle a Feel free Lure 11.5 and it is an awesome fishing machine. I also really like Wilderness systems. Native and Hobie are a couple other to look at as well.

If your ever in need of a fishing partner let me know!

Will for sure hit you up to fish once I get all my newbie kayak fishing problems out of the way! None of my other buddies fish let alone kayak fish so usually it's me by myself starts out as a trip to fish and end up me exploring and looking for better fishing spots. I'm really excited to get in the yak as I can cover more water and less bush. That being said I'm always up for some company that way someone can attest to my fishing stories other then the photos I take of my shoe instead of the fish cause I just suck at taking photos lol. Thanks for the reply!

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Just hit up outdoors oriented today guy I spoke to there was super nice super helpful and even answered the 1000 questions my son had. Amazing experience. I'm set on getting the perception prescador 10 I think. Little bit more research tonight and hopefully get out on the water soon. Thanks for all the suggestions and help everyone. And thanks outdoors oriented guy has awesome customer service. Defiantly will be back for other things I need along the way. Cheers!

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I have the bass pro FS10 sit in kayak. Extremely stable as it's wide. Take it out on lake erie all the time.

I would reccomend a sit on top kayak though... saving up for one now.

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I have a Nucanoe frontier 12, which is really stable, but is a bit heavy for loading onto the car.

Its very stable and can handle my fat butt, and all the junk i take with me. I can stand and cast on it no problem, and I am not the most coordinated person around. You are always welcome to try it out some day, just send me a message if you are interested. I live in Burlington but dont mind going out to new spots or areas.

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