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theoutdoorguy

big game calibers

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I been looking around for my hunting firearm and I've chosen the gun just deciding on the chambering its between 270 win, 7mm rem mag and 300 win mag

id be using it for dear, moose and elk and possibly long range hunting

id like to hear peoples thoughts  

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Hello outdoor guy .I use my 300 win mag for everything but I just drop down to a 150 grain bullet for deer .if you hit the deer in the right spot it wont cause alot of damage to the meat but if you shoot for the front shoulder you'll have a bunch of damage.180 grain for bigger animals and out to a 1000yards or better if you practice at different yardages and windages and trajectories.but I hunt with 6 others for moose and half use a270 and 308 and 7mm the others prefer.they all do the trick so I would think something in your price range and comfort when you hold it is also important when purchasing

 

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I have a 7mm magnum and a 308 that u used for moose . the 7mm shoots dead on every shot at 200 yards but the recoil is brutal . so I prefer the308 . but for long range the 7mm is the best .  td

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You may want to take a serious look at the new 6.5 Creedmore calibre that has recently hit the market.

It started out as a very accurate long range target caliber, but is getting rave reviews in the outdoor publications as a great hunting caliber,

and has less recoil than the .308.

 

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Out of the three I'd get a 270 for deer and a 300wm for moose and elk. IMHO the 7MM and 300 are overkill for deer unless you are shooting them at over 400 yds which is a whole other topic. If the moose and elk hunts are just "maybe one day hunts" I'd go with the 270, which can kill all with a well place shot. Or better yet get a 30-06 for a one gun does all as it can be easily loaded up or down on bullet weights depending on your quarry. And as teedee said the magnums aren't much fun to shoot, unless your really want one, then get a real one maybe a 338wm which thumps you and the moose good, that's what I use just for the heck of it.

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fishingking is right . a high powered rifle does not get many rounds put through it .. once sighted in it may or may not be fired when hunting that year . and next time to go u only put a couple rounds through it to check ur sights before u go hunting . so there are a lot of good used guns out there . and a lot of us older guys are getting to old to go hunting ..so guns are sold or passed down to the sons ..   td

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The first consideration is budget. The second consideration is your shooting experience. Third is what kind of hunting are you going to do. How popular is the caliber and how easy is it to get the factory ammo you need if you don't reload.

If you are on a budget buying one caliber to do everything may be a better idea. A used gun will save money. Taking it to a gunsmith to check out the bore for wear and throat erosion is a good idea on a used gun especially in a hot caliber that may have been used for a lot of long range target shooting.

Shooting experience and being able to deal with the recoil from a magnum caliber is something to consider. No matter what the caliber, the bullet still has to be able to hit the right vital spot. Better a caliber that is comfortable to shoot than one that punishes you with each shot.

What kind of hunting you plan to do is very important when choosing a gun/caliber/scope combination. Under 200 yards and often in thick bush? Stand sitting or hiking all over the country? Time to pick your shot or shoot offhand or off a hasty rest? Long range up to 600 yards. Each type of hunting has its own requirements. Having good quality glass on a gun can cost as much or more than the gun itself but  a 4x12 scope on the rifle may not be the best for a close shot in thick cover on a moving target.

I reload my rifle ammunition so I have some versatility in tuning a load for one species versus another. I shoot a 7mm Remington magnum with a 3x9 scope on it. 175 gr. Nosler partitions have taken moose for me. 140 gr Hornady loads have taken deer. I also have a 6mm Remington I use for coyote, jacks and deer. I have 75 gr loads for the smaller critters and a 100 gr load for deer. For all practical shooting distances I will find in northern Ontario for deer I prefer the 6mm because it is lighter and easier to handle. And if the going is thick and most shots are close for deer I really prefer the 12 ga. slug gun.

I suppose the best thing is to see if any of your friends have a gun in the calibers you are thinking of using and see if they will go to the range with you and let you shoot it. Some guns and calibers are not pleasant to shoot. A hot caliber in a light gun with a poor recoil pad will hurt you. A poor scope on a good rifle will disappoint you. Whatever you buy, practice, practice, practice in a variety of shooting positions and rests until you have determined you distance limit to put your bullets in a paper plate, i.e. the vitals of most big game animals.

 

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.308 is my all around for deer, moose and bear. For moose I will use 'quality' ammo like Federal Nosler Partition. Deer and bear anything your gun shoots well will do. Get good with the gun you get in any of the capable calibers and you can't go wrong. Dial it in and get comfortable shooting whatever you get.

 

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