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Chrisb

is it smelt time?

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I have noticed that the carp seem to spawning. I think that means it is too late for smelt.

I either missed them or they didn't show up where I was fishing.

Edited by Chrisb

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Wow. Quite the video there. Lmao and people wonder where the smelts are. When they are pillaged from the river like that the numbers are deff going to take a hit. Those are all spawners not getting a chance to do their thing. I Can't believe how greedy people are that they need to take coolers and buckets full of 4-5 inch fish. Maybe the fish have learned to spawn in the lake instead of running the gauntlet of dip nets and mass amounts of people who just have to fill the back of the pickup. Fishing isnt take take take. There has to be some give sometimes. 

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Funny we have 120 limit for minnows but no limit for smelts .....perhaps time for  100 per license (50 per. cons.)  :dunno:

 Smelts ( dead ,frozen) can be used for bait , especially when minnows are in short supply......

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We need not go further than Port Dal. for all the smelts we wanted . They came into the 4 falls so thick , a long handled minnow hoop net was all you needed to scoop 50 at a time . At the end of the run , the Welland Ship Canal was loaded with them ...big ones , but nearly all hens bursting with roe ....and soft , not the greatest for the table .  They would stay in the backwaters (spillway) before dying off , or following the ships back to either lakes.

As far as the smelt numbers declining ....not sure if netting them has much influence ....  salmon eating them  , water quality , or a cantankerous Ms.Nature . (that was back in the 50's-60's mainly)

Edited by smerchly

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2 hours ago, Chrisb said:

The rainbow smelt are actually not native to the lakes. They were introduced as a food source for the salmon.

Same with Muskrat (Cobden) Lake, to feed the lake trout.

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Lots of info from Wiki....   They are still a problem in other lakes  . We have had many new species added to our lakes since the intro of smelts ....like zebra mussels  &  gobies , and the lakes & fish seem to have adapted the new source of food .  We still have a problem with the lampreys which seem to be of no use what so ever .

 The smelt will be around for a long time  , going to miss this years smelt dinners .  I have heard there are places at L.Simcoe to get plenty of nice fat smelts ....we use to catch 8-9" er's ice fishing off Oro 11 in 90 fow. while fishing for white fish . the smelt were attracted by the Coleman lantern in the hut & could be caught 2' under the ice  .....we fried some up right there ! :wub:

   From Wiki ....some history on them....

Rainbow smelt invaded the Great Lakes watershed through an intentional introduction of eggs to Crystal Lake in 1912.[5] This lake drains into Lake Michigan, from which fish escaped into Lake Michigan and spread quickly throughout the Great Lakes and their tributaries. Early records documenting the smelt's range expansion in the Great Lakes include Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Ontario, and Lake Superior.[5] Rainbow smelt were first reported from Lake Ontario in 1929, and probably reached it by dispersal along natural waterways from the Finger Lakes, New York, where they were intentionally introduced in 1917. The ability of rainbow smelt to disperse is determined by the connectivity of lakes, the ability of smelt to move through connecting streams, and the suitability of connected lakes as habitat.[6] Rainbow smelt are weak swimmers so they cannot make it over fish ladders.[7] This has helped to prevent an even wider spread of their range.[citation needed]

 

 

Edited by smerchly

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16 hours ago, Chrisb said:

The rainbow smelt are actually not native to the lakes. They were introduced as a food source for the salmon.

They were here long before the Salmon.

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1 hour ago, boogaloo said:

They were here long before the Salmon.

Weren't the salmon introduced to control the smelt and or alewive populations?

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I don't remember salmon in L.Ont during the 50's but there was plenty of smelt and alewives (we called them shiners) ....great pike bait when we fished at the 1000 Islands .  (legal then).   Many species of fish are eating the smelts .....fishing for pike with a smelt , got a 12" perch !

Do any of the elderly folk here remember the MNR stocking Kamloops  here ?   We got some beauties at the 12 ......B)

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I found this info onthe Ohio DNR site.

 

Quote

Rainbow smelt are naturally occurring along the North Atlantic coast of North America and move into small freshwater streams to spawn. They were introduced to the Great Lakes in Michigan in 1912. They then spread throughout the Great Lakes and were first found in Lake Erie in 1932. By 1936 they had become established in Lake Erie and spawning runs occur annually in small northeast Ohio Lake Erie tributaries. The population in Lake Erie can fluctuate from year to year and some years large die offs occur after the spring spawning runs. Rainbow smelt feed on various aquatic invertebrates and some small fish.

 

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