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Has anyone every used gobies as live bait? I figured since they are an invasive species a good way to get rid of them is to use them as bait considering the fish have seen them and probably eat them. I was thinking about this for ever and haven't tried it yet.

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Has anyone every used gobies as live bait? I figured since they are an invasive species a good way to get rid of them is to use them as bait considering the fish have seen them and probably eat them. I was thinking about this for ever and haven't tried it yet.

Not knocking you but I think that you should read regulations on fishing. If you don't know somrthing like this there is a lot more you don't know. No use getting a fine if you don't have to.

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Feed the gobies to the gulls!

Try this instead:

https://www.basspro.com/Berkley-Gulp!-Goby/product/96983/

Find tubes, grubs or paddle tail baits in the 3-5 inch range, in the same colours as gobies and fish them on bottom with a jig head and you should do pretty well. Add some "flavour" to the baits to increase your odds. Your local B&T can direct for more great goby imitations.

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Looking at this realistically , there is absolutely no danger using a gobie for bait "if" it was caught in the same water where it's being used as bait . Strict rules would be needed , like no transporting them from the spot where they were caught . We have similar rules for crayfish . We know that fish such as bass and perch feed on them .....and I believe water birds can transport fertilized eggs to other bodies of water . The reason the rule applies is because "some" anglers would think it's okay to take gobies to northern lakes The globe is shrinking as we trade with other countries and it will be near impossible to stop the spread of invasive species . We must do our part to help stop the spread of invasives & also keep an eye on others who don't know or care about it .

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Feed the gobies to the gulls!

Try this instead:

https://www.basspro.com/Berkley-Gulp!-Goby/product/96983/

Find tubes, grubs or paddle tail baits in the 3-5 inch range, in the same colours as gobies and fish them on bottom with a jig head and you should do pretty well. Add some "flavour" to the baits to increase your odds. Your local B&T can direct for more great goby imitations.

You are not supposed to do that. You are supposed to destroy them not kill them and throw them back. Makes no sense

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Looking at this realistically , there is absolutely no danger using a gobie for bait "if" it was caught in the same water where it's being used as bait . Strict rules would be needed , like no transporting them from the spot where they were caught . We have similar rules for crayfish . We know that fish such as bass and perch feed on them .....and I believe water birds can transport fertilized eggs to other bodies of water . The reason the rule applies is because "some" anglers would think it's okay to take gobies to northern lakes The globe is shrinking as we trade with other countries and it will be near impossible to stop the spread of invasive species . We must do our part to help stop the spread of invasives & also keep an eye on others who don't know or care about it .

Smerch you are 100% right. What about this? You can not transport crayfish but you can use them for bait in the same water you caught them in. Whats the difference?

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The crayfish is a native species of southern Ontario waters. The round headed goby came to us through the shipping Chanel's. the ships pick the invasive species up in their ballasts and when emptying them they dropped them into our Eco system. The reason for killing them is to help eliminate them as they are merely a nuisance to the waterways. Yes the perch and bass feed on them heavily but when first introduced this species did a number on fish beds because there was no species that knew what to do with them.

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The crayfish is a native species of southern Ontario waters. The round headed goby came to us through the shipping Chanel's. the ships pick the invasive species up in their ballasts and when emptying them they dropped them into our Eco system. The reason for killing them is to help eliminate them as they are merely a nuisance to the waterways. Yes the perch and bass feed on them heavily but when first introduced this species did a number on fish beds because there was no species that knew what to do with them.

Agreed . I think we anglers catching & killing a few gobies is so insignificant compared to the billions in the lakes that using one for bait amounts to nearly zilch . We cannot use live smelts ....same scenario ,except we can use dead ones legally (kill the gobies first) ? We need to go after bigger fish ....literally ....like the Asian carp . Using gobies , smelt , crayfish , gizzard shad , alewives etc. etc.is small potatoes in comparison .

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The crayfish is a native species of southern Ontario waters. The round headed goby came to us through the shipping Chanel's. the ships pick the invasive species up in their ballasts and when emptying them they dropped them into our Eco system. The reason for killing them is to help eliminate them as they are merely a nuisance to the waterways. Yes the perch and bass feed on them heavily but when first introduced this species did a number on fish beds because there was no species that knew what to do with them.

I know all that.The purpose of my post was that if you can use crayfish for bait why can't you use gobies for bait in the same water they came from. If you are using them as bait you are not releasing them and if one got away what harm would it do?

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The reason we can't move crayfish is because they are rusty crayfish, which are not native to these waters. There are 2 different species in our waters. I agree with smerch on having to catch the gobies where you are going to use them.

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The reason we can't move crayfish is because they are rusty crayfish, which are not native to these waters. There are 2 different species in our waters. I agree with smerch on having to catch the gobies where you are going to use

It is against the law to transport any species of crayfish. Rusty or not

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The carp are a very scary thought and as a Canadian citizen I would love to see better measures implemented to keep those stupid things out!!!

They are coming from the States and it is all up to them. Chicago is thinking of blocking their canal systems to L MIchigan at a cost of 18bn dollars. I think that eventually they will be here. Think that they can slow them down but not stop them. Just a matter of time.

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The carp will be here eventually yes, Gov't can implement any measures they can but one thing to remember is there is no way to stop air born invasion, much like small ponds in the area, we see population of bass showing up due to birds transferring over land and landing in a new water, it will eventually happen same concept with the carp.

As for Gobies, live, they'd make awesome bait, I once had a gobie take a jig second later bass smashed the gobie. In my opinion if Gov't legalized it we'd have idiots transferring to areas where gobie's are non existent yet, sure it would be law, but we still have idiots doing it with minnows... it's one of the situations where it's best to just leave it alone.

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It's sick ! Some if u old timers may remember Lake Erie being referred to as " the Dead Sea" !!!! Only positive this I see out if it , is that If they make it to the welland river I will never buy skeets again instead stand on shore and have a guy drive a boat by and as they jump out of the water " baboom" !! JMO

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theres a few videos i have seen on youtube where people use gobies as bait, they do well for perch and bass. but for myself, my gobies usually make friends with the hungry gulls. one thing i miss about living in northern ontario, i could drop a hook with a worm on it into the rivers/lakes and not have to worry about gobies ripping the worms to shreds,

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one day a few summers ago were sight fishing shallow smallies.

we had a bunch of dead gobies as "initially" it was suggested not to even put the dead ones back in the water.

my old man had an idea while we were enjoying a sanwhich for lunch.

lets toss them at the bass and see what happened.

sure as anything, first toss, bass came up and smashed it on the surface...

but it gets better.

dad wanted to see how close he could get a bass to our boat....

after about 8 gobies, he had a bass directly below the boat, feeding it....

nature works in strange ways, lol.

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One of my main concerns is how the toxins found in gobies affect other fish that eat them . Here's a link with some info on that issue .....scroll down to the last paragraph about gobies .

http://www.great-lakes.net/envt/flora-fauna/invasive/goby.html

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  • 2 weeks later...

Berkley makes a power goby.

I saw these at Canadian Tire yesterday and though that's a great idea! Purple tubes work pretty well anyway but I might try the Power Goby. (man I have so much plastic bait............)

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