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I have to admit that I'm not a very good trout fisherman, but I do love to get out and try to catch the odd trout from time to time....When fishing at a popular and busy spot for trout, some but not all of the fishermen tend to get on my case for crossing their lines when I cast....What should I do in this case???  Do I just pack up and leave, or try to fit in with the other trout fishermen???  I always thought that for the most part, fishermen were gentlemen, but this is not always the case.......Thanking you in advance for your opinions......................

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Great question.  People do need to realize that everyone starts somewhere so should have patience but as a new fisherman it is also important that you learn the etiquette and follow the rules of fishing in a group. 
 

So, are you float fishing, bottom bouncing, or tossing artificial lures?

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8 minutes ago, Mbocco said:

Great question.  People do need to realize that everyone starts somewhere so should have patience but as a new fisherman it is also important that you learn the etiquette and follow the rules of fishing in a group. 
 

So, are you float fishing, bottom bouncing, or tossing artificial lures?

3 way split.............So I guess that it's bottom bouncing.............

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ok Cool.  Here’s a few tips.  
1.  Find a spot as upstream as possible.  Those downstream of you need to pay attention to your line more so than the opposite. 
2.  Cast upstream to 10 o’clock and reel back no later than 2 o’clock if you have people downstream of you.  Reel in quickly so that your rig skims the surface and keep your rod tip down while doing so. It’s less likely to cross that way. 
3.  Practice the accuracy of your casting at all times so that if u end up in the middle of the pack at some point you won’t cross because of a bad cast. 

4.  If you are downstream of other anglers then then it’s on you to pay attention to where and when they cast.  If they cast out to 10 o’clock then you should wait until he bounces to about 12 o’clock before you cast out to 10 o’clock.   Hopefully that made sense.l because it’s a key point.   Those downstream of you also need to wait.  A line of anglers can work in sequence with no crossing if everyone pays attention. 
5.  Be ready when it’s your turn so as not to inconvenience those downstream and to keep the sequence in good rhythm. 
6.  Reel in if someone is on a fish close to you. 
7. If u happen to cross be nice and apologize. 
 

There’s likely more but that’s a good start!

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And here’s another I just remembered ...

 

If you aren’t good at the technique at the beginning, go out for an hour at a less popular time (bad weather, stained water, middle of the day).  There will be less people or none at all!  You may not catch anything but your main goal would be to practice your casting.

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1 minute ago, Mbocco said:

And here’s another I just remembered ...

 

If you aren’t good at the technique at the beginning, go out for an hour at a less popular time (bad weather, stained water, middle of the day).  There will be less people or none at all!  You may not catch anything but your main goal would be to practice your casting.

Thanks for the tips....................

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Bottom bouncing in a crowd takes a bit of a knack....you kind of have to take turns casting...even with people you think are fishing pretty far away from where you are standing....but even then is a matter of timing...for example...watch the first couple people downstream to you.....one guy casts....the person beside them waits a few seconds for the first guys line to drift then casts and so on....watch when the person beside you casts....watch thier line and rod tip.....wait for thier line to tighten then watch the arch as it comes your way....when that line is into the last half of the drift then you should be good to cast....or wait until they start reeling in and then cast......often people downstream will wait for the upstream person to cast...but that's not always the case...the amount of weight you use and distance you cast is also a factor.....short casts will most likely have you tangle with someone's line alot....take a bit of time and try to watch what the other anglers are doing can help you get the idea....its more practice than anything....but people tend to forget that they had to learn how to fish this way as well...and always going to be a couple people who think they own the spot...if you get the chance to....get out with someone who is versed in the type of fishing you are doing....avoiding getting tangled with other anglers is only part of the learning curve...current speed...wind are also factors.....for starts...I tried to explain a little bit but watching what others are doing around you also helps alot

 

 

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All good points, obviously experience is key and understanding how to join the 

" flow" will help. Personally, I won't fish in a line of fishermen and will put in the leg work to get away from the crowds. For me, getting away from crowds while fishing is just as important as catching. Hope you have some " drag free drifts" sooner than later!

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You don't want to cast a float with bottom bouncers (or vice versa) You need to match the cadence of the drift with presentation.

Sequencing casts, be patient. If not sure. Watch and observe.

 

And no stealing a persons spot because they catch fish or have retie because of snag. Spot is only available after person packs up and leaves.

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Another point someone that doesn't have alot of experience might not take into consideration while learning is....although someone might be quite a ways down stream from you if they are casting far out....their drift often ends with their line actually being out in front and across..even past where you are standing...(watch as lines get reeled in)..you will be surprised....like I have mentioned in some of my steelie posts...I also take the time to pick and choose my casts according to the current flow as well...it takes experience but learning how to read the current helps alot as well...when its flowing fast I dont even cast...its more often then not snag city seconds after your line hits the water....also watch if its pushing toward shore..this can often run your bait into a snag before your line even tightens...and also can tend to tangle people's lines together..using weights on the heavier side..even an oz or more will help you control the drift...keep your line out in productive water for longer...allow for a more natural presentation...a longer drift time...and contact with the bottom (hence the term bottom bouncing)...you always want your line to be tight after contact with the bottom so you can feel your weight dragging the bottom...lift the rod slightly to keep your sinker upright....it will come..none of us learned how to do it in a day....I have over 40 years experience fishing the river in all different situations.....and it also wouldn't hurt for the more experienced anglers to have a bit of patience...or better yet..lend a bit of advice on technique and tackle in a busy spot as well.... we all have our reasons we love fishing...I'm more than happy to help the person beside me catch one...I've caught more than my fair share of trophy sized trout over the years 🎣

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, bobert said:

All good points, obviously experience is key and understanding how to join the 

" flow" will help. Personally, I won't fish in a line of fishermen and will put in the leg work to get away from the crowds. For me, getting away from crowds while fishing is just as important as catching. Hope you have some " drag free drifts" sooner than later!

 Exactly !  I  don't enjoy being crowded and will find another spot where there' some breathing room  . It's a different story when carp fishing since lines sit on one spot ....to a point .

JW ...you mentioned using pencil weight (one oz+) ....Some use the ball weights and I mostly use the bell weights with a cheap snap swivel for quick changes .  We use "bottom bouncer" weights with the 6" wire from boats to skip over rocky bottoms .....I wonder if a  lead weight with a 3 -4" wire would help prevent sinkers from getting wedged between the rocks.....?

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