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Gotta train them to do that to gobies

That would be good if they ate gobies but they don't school up like perch . I saw a cormorant swallowing a good size trout ,about 10 to 12" at Port Dalhousie harbour a few yrs.ago . I was amazed and angry to see that happen . I have seen flocks of these birds a mile long at the Bay of Quinte and L.Ontario near Jordan Harbour . I hope the ministry is keeping tabs on this situation . The perch population seems to be thriving well in spite of these birds .(check out the latest posts on the perch catches) :Gonefishing:

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The MNR are doing something about these birds . Their aim is reduce the giants flocks by up to 90% in the Thunder Bay & L.Michigan areas . These birds have been wiping out whitefish , perch & brown trout populations . This article (2008) is very interesting and maybe there is hope we will reduce these birds populations .

http://blog.mlive.co...inning_cor.html

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Guest Rockfish

Are people angry because they are invasive? Seems like they are just doing their thing, and what they have always done.

Depends how long ago someone would think that they were invasive at one time as they expanded their range.

Double-crested Cormorants are not new to Ontario; they are known to have been a resident of Lake of the Woods since 1798. The earliest nesting record for cormorants in Ontario is from Black Bay in Lake Superior in 1920. By 1931, cormorants were breeding in Lake Huron and by 1938 they were breeding in Lake Ontario. Today cormorants are found throughout the Great Lakes and in many inland lakes and rivers in Ontario.

http://www.ofah.org/cormorants/

How bad is the cormorant crisis? Biologically speaking, it's out of control. Provincially, cormorant numbers are 250-times historic population records.

Each cormorant eats a minimum of one-pound of fish per day; in other words, it takes about three yellow perch to feed the cormorants' voracious daily appetite. In Ontario, the net effect is over 42 million pounds of fish consumed by cormorants each year. Worse than what cormorants take is what they leave behind - that is, only the skeletons of mature shoreline trees. Cormorant droppings are so toxic they have destroyed thousands of miles of precious shoreline habitat.

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n the flip side of the coin, they are a good indicator of fishing conditions. if you've never watched them, I suggest that you do, cause it's interesting. when the Cormorants aren't feeding, the bite is low or dead. when they are feeding, the bite is good. even though these birds are detrimental to the environment, they are good for at least one thing. :)

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They've become a major problem for the crappie populations here in Oklahoma. On top of that, the mess they make. We crappie fish (as I've explained to a few guys I've gone out with here) in floating houses over structure on the water. The houses have a huge hole in the floor to fish through (similar to an ice hut, but the hole is 8' by 20' in most cases). More times than I can count, a cormorant will dive for fish, and come up in the middle of that house. Instead of diving, and going back out, they always take off, jump the railings, and decide to make a complete mess out of the place with their droppings. One house has the doors and windows closed, and four birds were stuck in there for close to six hours. I'm glad I didn't see the mess from that incident.

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