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Pickled Carp?

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Just tried this at a buddy's, REALLY good!!! Going to go carp fishing soon and try to make a batch for myself...

Starting with carp fillets, cut out the dark meat and discard. Cut the fillets into one-inch chunks and soak for two days in a brine made of 1-1/2 cups of plain salt in a gallon of water. Keep the fish refrigerated at all stages of the brining/pickling process.

After two days, drain the brine and soak the fish in distilled white vinegar for another two days.

Next, combine four cups of white vinegar, two teaspoons of whole cloves, 2-1/2 cups of sugar, two teaspoons of whole allspice, eight bay leaves, two teaspoons of whole black pepper and four teaspoons of mustard seed. Boil the mix slowly for five minutes, then cool.

Remove carp from the vinegar and drain. Pack the fish in pint jars, alternating fish layers with sliced onions. Pour the spiced vinegar over the fish, cap the jars and refrigerate once more. Let the jars stand for two days.



Mike

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You're welcome to any carp I catch. I wouldn't be able to choke it down, no matter how good it is. Purely psychological, but there is no way I could do it.

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just keep in mind, carp taste the way the water looks, green ribbon trail carp will taste like mud and bland, but clean clear water they will taste better. i still will not eat one, but i wont judge those who do:P

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Noooooooo Carrrrrpppp for me...lol. But then again, people eat bass and I dont like bass either.

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Just out of curiosity, why the negative vibe surrounding the consumption of carp?

Is it because they are primarily considered to be bottom feeders,, if so how do you like your lobster?

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The brine is similar to a herring brine we once used to pickle herrings and smelt



Just out of curiosity, why the negative vibe surrounding the consumption of carp?

Is it because they are primarily considered to be bottom feeders,, if so how do you like your lobster?

Or sole, cod, halibut, etc.....

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Just out of curiosity, why the negative vibe surrounding the consumption of carp?

Is it because they are primarily considered to be bottom feeders,, if so how do you like your lobster?

i think its the stigma attached to carp, most assume its a dirty garbage eating fish. also the bottom feeders so people assume its a fish that people wouldnt eat, i still wouldnt eat it since im picky with what fish i consume, but im interested in it still

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Just out of curiosity, why the negative vibe surrounding the consumption of carp?

Is it because they are primarily considered to be bottom feeders,, if so how do you like your lobster?

I know whats on the shoreline...so just imagine whats on the bottom. Europeans love carp. Ive tried it before...dont like the taste. I really like catfish myself, where others wont touch them.

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I have not had the chance to cook carp, but I have eaten it on 2 occasions and found it very nice, both were battered and deep fried, there is a traditional method of cooking whole snapper in sesame oil called hauchinango (spelling might be inaccurate), then uses of fresh ginger, chilies and citrus finish the dish. In my opinion this will be the way I prepare my first carp given the opportunity.

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I know the Jewish eat them... so they must be consumable fresh vs pickling..

I can just not bring myself to tell the wife I brought home carp for dinner

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I know the Jewish eat them... so they must be consumable fresh vs pickling..

I can just not bring myself to tell the wife I brought home carp for dinner

Better than telling your wife you brought home another woman for dinner lol, that wouldn't go over we'll.

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He didn't tell me before I ate it, Half the bloody jar was gone, then he said, oh yea its carp.... Still gotta say it was really good, he told me use the smaller ones, and he takes out all red flesh. He told me also he has fried them but you need to score the flesh because of the bones, fillet like normal but you cut 2/3 of the way through every 1/8 of an inch, this allows the bones to fall out and get soft.

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Hey ChefMick, would that method work for pike? Also do you need high heat to cook the bones out or would the relatively low heat of a smoker cook the bones? Was thinking to smoke some just to try, maybe apple wood or grapevines, a couple of hours in a salt brine before then on the smoker? I just finished a wild garlic pesto that I need to try, used hazelnuts and the leaves of wild garlic instead of basil. I have the bulbs in jars being pickled.

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Smoking carp after a brine, I've heard is quite popular, as for pike I've never tried to render its bones, usually either fully clean them, which takes time, or cook them whole and flake away the meat with a combing style fork.

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From what my grandparents and uncles taught (Finns and Swedes who love pickled fish), the Y bones in pike don't soften up in cooking, smoking or brining. Even smoked pike had to be carefully deboned. The oldtimers just about threw everything in the smoker. Pike sheephead,bowfin, cats, gar....

You don't want to have those bones stuck in your throat.

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I like pike, and allways cook them whole on the barbeque. stuff them with butter and onions and flake away the flesh but still have to watch for bones.

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Don't think I could bring myself to eat carp unless like that situation nobody told me then I'd probably enjoy it

Strangely enough, the common carp was originally imported to North America as a sustainable, highly desired food source :)

http://www.nps.gov/miss/naturescience/carphist.htm

I have never eaten a carp myself but love to catch them! very sporting fish!

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