Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
dr_feelgood

Coyotes in the news.

Recommended Posts

Whaddaya know about coyotes?

There could be a lucrative consulting contract from city hall if you can give councillors some sensible advice about keeping the wilyCanis latransout of Chippawa.

Ridding the village of coyotes is just the latest issue to briefly distract city councillors from the real business of running the municipality.

Coun. Shirley Fisher sounded the alarm bell at a community services committee meeting Monday. She saw a coyote last weekend in the wooded area around her house.

"Coyotes can be a nasty, nasty little animal," said Fisher, an apparent Roadrunner fan, adding city hall needs to do something about them.

Nasty? Who knows? But coyotes don't seem very bright, based on what the world knows about them from Saturday morning cartoons. Maybe a pile of ACME bird seed and an anvil would do the trick.

City clerk Dean Iorfida seemed to steer politicians away from wildlife management issues, saying they could write to the Ministry of Natural Resources.

"I don't know what we're going to do on coyotes. We're not exactly experts in that field."

On the long list of things about which city hall has no expertise, coyotes has to be high on the list.

It has become a recurring theme in this column that city officials should stick to providing municipal services. Sometimes, the flights of fancy Niagara Falls councillors go on are just too good not to share.

They're a fairly seasoned group of politicians. A rough calculation shows they have an average of 9.7 years of experience (Coun. Wayne Thomson's nearly 30 years in public office skews the average way up).

Continued After Advertisement Below

Advertisement

That's why it's surprising to see how often they tilt at windmills.

At the same meeting, Thomson railed against the Regional Municipality of Niagara's bid to devise a logo for Niagara. A marketing company suggested a lower-case 'n' with a white maple leaf imposed on it, with the message "niagara original." Thomson and occasional-ally Carolynn Ioannoni double-teamed the issue, questioning the value of the money the region spent.

Later, Thomson revived his objections about the region's -again with the region -line-painting crew. The region has a crew of municipal workers who paint yellow and white lines and turning arrows on its streets. Thomson doesn't understand why the region has it's own department instead of outsourcing the work.

Worse, he's outraged by the sweet deal the Niagara Parks Commission gets by contracting the region's crew to paint its lines.

On the same night they tackled Chippawa's coyote crisis, Marketing 101 and Line-painting-gate, councillors voted on a report that said tax arrears owed by Historic Niagara Development were preventing the company from cashing in on a downtown revitalization grant program. No one seemed concerned enough to ask how big the debt actually is.

Later, they rubber-stamped the 13-page municipal accounts report that lists every cheque the city has written between June 19 and July 30 without any discussion at all.

You'd be surprised how much money a city can spend in six weeks. It came to $26.5 million of your money.

A report itemizing every penny city councillors are responsible for gets no discussion. But coyotes and the micro-managing of some other municipality's line-painting crew -that is what's important.

Fisher and Thomson aren't the only councillors to stray into the legitimate business of some other public body. But it was their turn this week.

Others indulge in their own crusades that really have little to do with city business.

(Coun. Jim Diodati used to rally for lower gas prices in Niagara Falls when the price was 90 cents a litre. But now that his private business doesn't take him out of town as much, he has been noticeably silent even though we're paying about $1.25).

It might come as a shock to self-absorbed politicians, but not every problem has a solution at city hall. In reality, councillors in Niagara Falls have a very small set of responsibilities limited, basically, to roads, sewers, fire trucks, arenas, pools and parks.

Yet they want to know how to round up coyotes and why the parks commission gets a good deal on line-painting.

What's wrong with knowing your job and sticking to it?

There's a lot to be said for the kind of single-minded focus self-professed "super-genius" Wile E. Coyote has on catching the Roadrunner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest canada

I know 2 guys that hunt them..........they over 60 last year and most were not to healthy! The population is way out of control

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since many of the coyotes lie within ares where firearms are not allowed in City Limits, the only real solution is to learn to co-exist with them. What is the definition of out of control? To classify any animal as a "a nasty creature" is a irresponsible comment. There is no quick fix to Coyotes. The City of Chigago has been examining them for years now, spending millions, and they results are very interesting. Probably the nastiest creature in Niagara is humans, who have ruined a skyline, ripped up a moraine for a casino, taken away the best agriultural land in Canada for subdivisions and highways.

Seeing on coyote does not constitues a crisis.

my thoughts..whirlpool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right on whirpoolhunter......Bulldoze the trees , fill in the swamps ,build big expensive houses & bring in Walmart . The wildlife such as coyotes, fox, deer , rabbits etc.....the amphibians , & pheasants , grouse & etc etc etc ., can go elsewhere . When a coyote gets hungry & seeks food in the "new hood" the people panic & want them exterminated .......To those people .....don't worry they will all be gone soon & you can show your kids pictures like we do like the dodo bird. They call it progress....gotto grow grow grow until we lose our farmlands & have to buy our food from other countries that keep their food growing land sacred , not up for grabs for some multi millionaire developers.......We have new housing all around me & you should here the whining about the bird bangers coming from the distant farms......We need to build UP the cities & keep our farms .....but $$$$$$$$$$$ talks........ There are farmers who have problems with coyotes ....let them deal with it the way they have been for years.....We humans are the ones taking away their homes . My bud lives out in the boonies in Fenwick , & new homes are going up all over the place on previous bush lots .Already the city slickers who bought these $600,000 & over houses want sidewalks & streelights.......city in the country ! Our wildlife hasn't got a chance.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing one coyote?! You don't get outside much do you.

I will agree with most of your points though. I feel their numbers are naturally controlled by disease or availability of food (starvation) but hunting does take its place in controlling their numbers. The coyote population in the no fire zones are more influenced by other imbalances such as a ballooning deer populations which does have a detrimental effect on the habitat of many other species. Allow us to control the deer and the coyote's will follow right?

Farmers caught in the no fire zone however should be allowed to invite hunters to control the coyote population if their livestock is being affected. If deer and other coyote prey populations do suddenly drop there will surely be coyote conflicts. Having these problems in a no fire zone will compound the problem.

Despite the lack of knowledge on these animals and the resulting prejudges they are hunted at lengths but will never be eliminated. Due to shear numbers and stealthiness, you'll likely never see them on the endangered list. If hunting coyotes were to suddenly stop right now, by this time next year problem coyote reports would surely be a regular thing in the paper. I figure disease would then play a much bigger role then hunting.

Yes the winter before last we saw many coyotes in the bush and my dog caught the mange. Probably because she chases them. Some hunters were finding dead coyotes, frozen from exposure due to hair loss caused by mange. All the while as they were hunted at lengths but their numbers rebounded dramatically last year!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest canada

Well said Dan.....The persons who critisize the hunting of coyotes are ignorant of the population size and really the detramental effects an out of control species has on the enviroment. The 2 hunters I know who regularly hunt for them are invited by farmers and landowners to try to get the population in check. The thing is when a population gets out of control the whole population gets stressed and becomes unhealthy, it's much better im my opinion to have a lower population of healthy animals then a large population of sick, unhealthy animals. I agree man is the most distructive creature in Niagara but people have to understand this is an urban area in the year 2008 and not the 1800's so many things have changed including the amount of Habitat to support certain species! Species need to be managed so our area can support healthy populations. Its easy for us to sit back and critisize the building of new homes in previous bushlots but remember one thing the home you live in and the subdivision you live was once a prime farmland and habitat for wildlife. Because your home ruined the land 40yrs or more ago dosn't make you anyless guilty of destroying an area, so perhaps we should think alittle bit for condeming people today when we as a population are just as guilty of urbanization :worthy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seeing one coyote?! You don't get outside much do you.

I will agree with most of your points though. I feel their numbers are naturally controlled by disease or availability of food (starvation) but hunting does take its place in controlling their numbers. The coyote population in the no fire zones are more influenced by other imbalances such as a ballooning deer populations which does have a detrimental effect on the habitat of many other species. Allow us to control the deer and the coyote's will follow right?

Farmers caught in the no fire zone however should be allowed to invite hunters to control the coyote population if their livestock is being affected. If deer and other coyote prey populations do suddenly drop there will surely be coyote conflicts. Having these problems in a no fire zone will compound the problem.

Despite the lack of knowledge on these animals and the resulting prejudges they are hunted at lengths but will never be eliminated. Due to shear numbers and stealthiness, you'll likely never see them on the endangered list. If hunting coyotes were to suddenly stop right now, by this time next year problem coyote reports would surely be a regular thing in the paper. I figure disease would then play a much bigger role then hunting.

Yes the winter before last we saw many coyotes in the bush and my dog caught the mange. Probably because she chases them. Some hunters were finding dead coyotes, frozen from exposure due to hair loss caused by mange. All the while as they were hunted at lengths but their numbers rebounded dramatically last year!

Dan: I don't know who the comment if the comment "you dont get out much" was directed at me. I was referring to the fact that counciller Shirley Fisher saw one coyote when she brought this to city Council. I hike daily and fish daily and do in fact get out quite a bit. I have also been lucky enough to see many coyotes in my ramblings. To Canada I also realize this is a urban area, but I question where present develompment is allowed. It is a crime that we are building on agricultural land, yet closing canning factories and importing food. The biggest error was to build the QEW in the best farmland area in Canada. We should learn from our errors of the past, and encourage development, transportation Corridors, North of the Escarpment and not below the escarmpment. We should encourage infilling and higher density housing and keep the bush and open farmland we have now. In "no fire zones" farmers are allowed to shoot coyotes and other varmints protecting livestock.

Whirpool

Whirlpoolhunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yes you are correct and it is the ignorant people who see one coyote and get upset that my comment is directed to. (Sorry if I offended anyone) It is our job to educate the public as well as hunters who automatically get threatened by a few coyotes or cormorants. In balanced numbers they are beneficial and have their place. Not allowing over populations to be managed however feeds the perception that these animals are simply a nuisance.

Farmers can shoot coyotes but farmers are too busy farming! They can hire an agent which makes them liable and costs even more money. They should be able to scratch the hunters back by providing land to hunt for other species that need controlling and then the hunters scratches the farmers back in return by taking some of the coyotes and crop detrimental animals off the land.

I would not recommend this arrangement if coyote numbers were down but so far I haven't seen that scenario despite hunting pressure. It's all about balance and like Canada said so well, we are all part of the problem. Now I'll say lets make sure we're allowed to be part of the solution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh yes you are correct and it is the ignorant people who see one coyote and get upset that my comment is directed to. (Sorry if I offended anyone) It is our job to educate the public as well as hunters who automatically get threatened by a few coyotes or cormorants. In balanced numbers they are beneficial and have their place. Not allowing over populations to be managed however feeds the perception that these animals are simply a nuisance.

Farmers can shoot coyotes but farmers are too busy farming! They can hire an agent which makes them liable and costs even more money. They should be able to scratch the hunters back by providing land to hunt for other species that need controlling and then the hunters scratches the farmers back in return by taking some of the coyotes and crop detrimental animals off the land.

I would not recommend this arrangement if coyote numbers were down but so far I haven't seen that scenario despite hunting pressure. It's all about balance and like Canada said so well, we are all part of the problem. Now I'll say lets make sure we're allowed to be part of the solution.

Chille: No offense taken at all, thank you for your clarification. You are also correct in saying that we are all part of the problem, the population of Canada having one of the largest ecological footprints in the world. It is up to the individual, to be part of the solution, rather then to pass the blame to someone else. In some cases individuals must be swayed by government regulation to do so. What was considered acceptable 10-20 years ago, in many cases is no longer.

The key to ecological stability is diverersity and balance.

Whirlpool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears that the mange did naturally kill many of these animals. To the point that rabbits have been able to flourish. .

I have a little difficulty in seeing the "detramental effects" and I couldn't agree more with you chilli.

Somehow I don't think that by shooting we are able to only kill the old, sick or injured.

Their natural diet is small rodents such as mice, groundhogs and rabbits. They also eat birds, eggs, snakes, turtles, fish, fruit, plants and road kill. I have seen them take a deer down quickly on the ice. And coyotes do not form structured packs like wolves. A pack of coyotes is usually a group of siblings. Male and female are the basic social unit. They represent less than 1% of all diagnosed incidents in wild animals of rabies carriers over the last 40 years.

They are very smart and adaptable. So it is difficult to trap them. And they are shy.

Dang, Maple Leaf Foods has injured, killed or affected us humans more in one month than coyotes have in the last 30 years.

"Chief among the coyote’s numerous foes are people. In some areas, 90 percent of the deaths of coyotes older than five months are caused by people, whether purposefully with guns, poison, and traps, or accidentally with vehicles and farm machinery. sarcoptic mange, an infestation by microscopic mites that causes thickening of the skin, loss of hair, and itching. Heartworm and hookworm are other common parasites of coyotes."

Research has demonstrated that when coyotes are hunted, they compensate by producing larger litters and expanding their range.

"Although there are circumstances where predation by coyotes is still a serious problem for livestock producers, most people today realize that the coyote is not the worthless menace that it was once thought to be. The use of poison is now controlled by law. Bounties, or rewards, generally shown to be ineffective, are rare. Predator control is aimed at specific local problems. However, much of the research done on the coyote is still aimed at reducing predation on sheep. Also, respect for coyotes is required in urban areas, where they are increasingly at home. There are recent cases where these wild canines have attacked humans; children have been seriously injured."

Although it sometimes causes problems, the coyote has its rightful place in the animal kingdom. More and more people, including farmers, appreciate its value as a scavenger and a predator of rodents. The coyote’s economic importance and its role in nature should be considered in any evaluation of the animal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh - I forgot to add - Bang on Doc - we see this stuff and nobody makes our paid electives responsible for what the true issues were voted them in for.

They seem to dance with each other and never solve the problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest canada

Thats sad so many Coyotes are dying from disease and such, it just confirms that controlling the population is a much needed practice. When populations get out of controll it effects the whole popualtion, disease, starvation and such can wipe out most of the population it's a very sad way to die with much suffering on the part of animals. If a population is kept in check the numbers of animals may be smaller but much more healthy and happy where outbreaks of disease are controlled and not spread throughout the entire group. We live in an ubanized society in Niagara and this also effects the range of some wildlife unfortunatly " it is what it is" therefore the wildlife needs to be controlled in some method. This is not the area of the 1800's the population has flourished and each one of us is part of problem wether you live in the city or the country the land you reside on now was once part of wilderness. By hunting we are not trying to kill off the old and sick, the goal is to control the population so disease and starvation is avoided. It may sound crazy but by harvesting the animals we are in fact preventing the outbreaks of diseased and starving animals by keeping the populations at healthy sustainable level. Hunters in fact are probably the most ecofriendly group in our population, they care for the populations and keep a very close eye on the enviroment and protect more habitat then most other groups. The wilderness is our playground we respect the animals and the enviroment and only harvest what is needed to keep the populations healthy and vibrant. When we loose large parts of popualtion to starvation and disease it's very depressing, if the populations are stressed it effects our sport directly and as hunters we do what ever we can to make sure healthy population is sustained.As for the rabbits florishing this is because probably that there on the high end of there cycle. Rodents, rabbits, grouse and such populations are controlled by cycles, some years on the high end of cycle the population is high, low end low populations this is natures way of controll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe the high numbers of rabbits are due to the mange reducing coyotes because their numbers were so saturated, I'm surprised the mange didn't wipe them out. Unfortunately the mange didn't do it's job this time which may indicate how isolated each "pack" or community of coyote has become due to development. Perhaps we're just concentrating them in smaller areas. I do agree with rabbit cycles because I've observed this many times with no explanation.

Fanggo I'd love to read your resources. The theory of hunting impacting breeding is interesting. I don't think they're unless or don't have a place though. Their scat clearly displays their mousing abilities and they have a beautiful coat at certain times of the year. I feel bad that political situations have given them a bad rap. With groups like PETA this will surely get worse. Preventing farmers from allowing hunters to control them on their own land will also fuel hatred for this animal.

Bush roaches or ground seagulls they are not. Kept in check they are a beautiful creature to watch if they let you. The Canada Goose is another great creature loosing respect due to their numbers. I wish someone would take me goose hunting to help me get started. There's allot of meat just waiting to be harvested there but people only see a turd machine on the sidewalk and grass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ive had coyote's literally in my back yard nightly for over 10 years now, there are a very skittish dog and never come too close to the houses, although you can hear their presence nightly with the howles.

in my experience living on a farm growin up with them and living on a revine lot now they avoid humans at all costs and its very rare to actually have an incident with them.

the only time ive ever seen them come close is on my old farm when food seems scarce they were pokin around the chicken pens..

but like i said i live in the sub urbs on a ravine lot with a healthy population of coyote's and never once had an issue with them. lots of baby's around and young children small dogs playing in the yards ext...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest IBC

The coyote is an extremely interesting animal ... the problems with them tend to occur mostly when people are careless ... you tie up your dog in an unfenced yard ... that is a drive by meal for a coyote ... you let your indoor cat outside ... thats free food ... you leave your garbage out ... its a freebie to rummage through if it smells dead ...

most coyote attacks have two sides to the story ... such as the place the attack occurred was where people would leave food for them ... so the coyote has been conditioned that anything small in that area could be edible ...

The coyote population also flows opposite to the population of rabbits and other small animals ... if you are seeing a large rabbit population expect the coyote population to grow the next year or two as the pups are going to grow up strong and healthy however if there is a lack of rabbits and other small animals expect a smaller more sickly coyote population over the next two or three years ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...

Fanggo I'd love to read your resources. The theory of hunting impacting breeding is interesting. I don't think they're unless or don't have a place though. Their scat clearly displays their mousing abilities and they have a beautiful coat at certain times of the year. I feel bad that political situations have given them a bad rap. With groups like PETA this will surely get worse. Preventing farmers from allowing hunters to control them on their own land will also fuel hatred for this animal.

...

Chilli - you can find this here http://www.kitchener.ca/pdf/coyote_fact_sheet.pdf under the "Why not trap and relocate" section.

Take care.

Edited by fanggo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chile: I don't think there is any push to not let farmers to allow hunters on their property to protect livestock. This is allowed even in no-fire zones in urban areas if you check local bylaws. Farmers are also well compensated for any loss of livestock under current provincial legislation. 1000 dollars per cattle for example. I think that coyotes should be treated like any other species. Limits, tags and perhaps even a closed season. The season for coyotes is not uniform in Ontario, im some WMA there is a closed season. There has only been on human death recorded in all of North America attributed to coyotes. Compare this to deaths by domestic and feral dogs, bees, rabies from racoons. Again coexistnce is the key. Good resources posted thanks..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chile: I don't think there is any push to not let farmers to allow hunters on their property to protect livestock. This is allowed even in no-fire zones in urban areas if you check local bylaws. Farmers are also well compensated for any loss of livestock under current provincial legislation. 1000 dollars per cattle for example. I think that coyotes should be treated like any other species. Limits, tags and perhaps even a closed season. The season for coyotes is not uniform in Ontario, im some WMA there is a closed season. There has only been on human death recorded in all of North America attributed to coyotes. Compare this to deaths by domestic and feral dogs, bees, rabies from racoons. Again coexistnce is the key. Good resources posted thanks..

Not always true.

http://www.niagarafishing.net/forums/index...showtopic=14077

Farmers are asking Council to allow hunters to manage coyotes and other wildlife in Grimsby and they are meeting the same old ignorant opposition. It's a no fire zone but if the farmers want to give up farming they can shoot the coyotes themselves or hire an agent which leaves the farmer liable. In Fort Erie, we have a huge no fire zone and nothing bigger than a 22 can be fired anywhere in town rural or otherwise..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not always true.

http://www.niagarafishing.net/forums/index...showtopic=14077

Farmers are asking Council to allow hunters to manage coyotes and other wildlife in Grimsby and they are meeting the same old ignorant opposition. It's a no fire zone but if the farmers want to give up farming they can shoot the coyotes themselves or hire an agent which leaves the farmer liable. In Fort Erie, we have a huge no fire zone and nothing bigger than a 22 can be fired anywhere in town rural or otherwise..

Chille: What are the other animals that need to be managed in Grimsby. Perhaps I have missed something in the news. The farmer in Question is not even from Grimsby. With the expanding urban areas there is also a safety issue here, dont you. Who are the "ignorant opposition"? Have they come forward yet?

I do believe that farmers and their agents do have a right to protect livestock and this is included in the City Bylaw. (check out the old bylaw and the draft one) I can see the concern with banning rifles in urban areas. Im sure many insured "Agents" would be more then willing to take care of the Coyote populations on individual properties. Do you advocate the use of dogs to track and hunt coyotes also. This also presents a problem since many landowners do not want dogs running free on their property. I do agree with you that it is a very complicated issue. Public safety should be the first concern. Has the Ministry done studies of the Coyote Populations in the Grimsby area. I also think that the "farmer is too busy farming" argument does not wash. Farmers hunt too, and certainly find time away from the farm to enjoy the sport. Also crossbows were not included as fire arms in the past bylaw, so there is a grey area there. Is this about coyote hunting, deer hunting or turkey hunting. The meeting should certainly be an intersting one. Kudos to the town council of Grimsby to bring this to a public forum, to address both the concerns of both we hunters, and local residents.

Edited by whirlpoolhunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chille: What are the other animals that need to be managed in Grimsby. Perhaps I have missed something in the news. The farmer in Question is not even from Grimsby. With the expanding urban areas there is also a safety issue here, dont you. Who are the "ignorant opposition"? Have they come forward yet?

I do believe that farmers and their agents do have a right to protect livestock and this is included in the City Bylaw. (check out the old bylaw and the draft one) I can see the concern with banning rifles in urban areas. Im sure many insured "Agents" would be more then willing to take care of the Coyote populations on individual properties. Do you advocate the use of dogs to track and hunt coyotes also. This also presents a problem since many landowners do not want dogs running free on their property. I do agree with you that it is a very complicated issue. Public safety should be the first concern. Has the Ministry done studies of the Coyote Populations in the Grimsby area. I also think that the "farmer is too busy farming" argument does not wash. Farmers hunt too, and certainly find time away from the farm to enjoy the sport. Also crossbows were not included as fire arms in the past bylaw, so there is a grey area there. Is this about coyote hunting, deer hunting or turkey hunting. The meeting should certainly be an intersting one. Kudos to the town council of Grimsby to bring this to a public forum, to address both the concerns of both we hunters, and local residents.

What are the other animals that need to be managed in Grimsby?

Has the Ministry done studies of the Coyote Populations in the Grimsby area?

Thanks to us, all wildlife needs to be managed and it is done so through "Wildlife Management Units, WMU's" not each municipality. Coyote populations are so high that the OMNR has opened an annual season on them.

Is this about coyote hunting, deer hunting or turkey hunting.

Ken Durham and the Niagara Landowners Association are concerned about coyotes but other farmers and hunters are jumping in to point out the rest of the mess the current Bylaw has left.

Also crossbows were not included as fire arms in the past bylaw, so there is a grey area there. Due to Grimsby's restrictive firearms bylaw(which does consider bows firearms) the OMNR (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources) has not been able to do its job there.

The farmer in Question is not even from Grimsby

The farmer bringing this into question is the leader of the Niagara Landowners Association who represents farmers over 2 WMU's. Once again, farmers from across Niagara are struggling and farmers in Grimsby and other no fire zones are at a disadvantage. It is probably better for an organizational leader to address this than some farmer from South Grimsby.

With the expanding urban areas there is also a safety issue here, dont you.

One of the biggest mistakes Town planners have made is to allow urban sprawl that allow wealthy city folk to buy dream homes in hunting and farming districts. Then the complaints about the smells of farming and bird bangers come. Wildlife corridors are interrupted and people don't understand why hunters are so close to their homes. This is a perfect example of why Town planners need to keep urban and rural areas separate and you should be a supporter of that theory.

I can see the concern with banning rifles in urban areas NO ONE is talking about bringing rifles into urban areas! Read the proposal!

Im sure many insured "Agents" would be more then willing to take care of the Coyote populations on individual properties. Are you going to pay the surcharge to pay for hired hunters? Whats the difference whether they get payed to remove excessive geese or they do it for free as a benefit?

Farmers hunt too, and certainly find time away from the farm to enjoy the sport. Kind of hard to call it enjoying a sport when your actually defending your crops from unmanaged wildlife. In fact I just spoke to a farmer here in FE who said they need more hunters to control the rising goose population that is growing off the soy bean crops. And what about the farmers who don't hunt. There are many of them. Should they pay the hunting farmer next door to help them?

Do you advocate the use of dogs to track and hunt coyotes also. This also

presents a problem since many landowners do not want dogs running free

on their property. I'm not sure if its even legal but you need a landowners permission to hunt on their property. If landowners don't want hunters, dogs or vacume cleaner salesmen, they can ask them to leave the property. Once asked a hunter (and his dog) must leave immediately or he is trespassing.

Who are the "ignorant opposition"? Have they come forward yet?

Yes they have and they always do/ always will.

ltte-smithville.jpg:(ltte-vineland.jpg

After I put in a rebuttal, D Yarema offered me a coyote fact sheet that I helped write. After deer season the OMNR sends hunters a survey we complete and send back information on coyote sightings and droppings.

The meeting should certainly be an intersting one. Kudos to the town council of Grimsby to bring this to a public forum, to address both the concerns of both we hunters, and local residents.

Yes it should be interesting but I'm beginning to wonder about the "we hunters" part :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chile: Thank you for answering my questions. I agree with you on the urban sprawl. Those that move into agricultural areas should not complain about bird bangers, odors etc. I am very aware that WMUs manage wildlife, but it is the municipalites that set the boundaries for firearms of all types, not the Ministry of Natural Resources. That makes the management of urban wildlife problematic. Grimsby is certainly a unique area and it is sad to see the urban sprawl has taken over the fruitlands North of the escarpment. This will be one for the elected officials to work out after hearing from all parties.

Edited by whirlpoolhunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="

name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="
type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.niagarafallsreview.ca/ArticleDi....aspx?e=1212455

This article is written by a hunter. Notice no stupid talk about banning firearms or expanding no fire zones for the sake of coyotes. No mention of hunting them either. Just the facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it seems these coyote people are relentless. They've pushed the issue to a revisit this Thursday. They've brought up some bogus concerns.

If your a member of the OFAH I suggest you get down to the Region right now and fill out an application to hunt coyote at the "Niagara Road 12" landfill site as they are claiming no one is interested anyway. I'm leaving now to make sure at least one application gets in. I was planning on waiting until march when nothing else is open but it seems you just can't wait that long with these anti's around anymore!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...